research https://www.publiccharters.org/ en Study Analysis: Charter School Funding Gap Contributes to Surging Inequity https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/12/03/study-analysis-charter-school-funding-gap-contributes-surging-inequity <span>Study Analysis: Charter School Funding Gap Contributes to Surging Inequity </span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/melinda" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Melinda</span></span> <span>Thu, 12/03/2020 - 10:55</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-author-bio field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/about-us/staff/christy-wolfe" hreflang="en">Christy Wolfe</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-12-03T12:00:00Z">December 3, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2020-12/Four%20young%20students%20with%20backpacks%20square.png?itok=znFNaybI" width="250" height="250" alt="Two young students with backpacks" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The most recent in a series of reports from the University of Arkansas, <a href="https://cpb-us-e1.wpmucdn.com/wordpressua.uark.edu/dist/9/544/files/2018/10/charter-school-funding-inequity-surges-in-the-city.pdf">Charter School Funding: Inequity Surges in the Cities</a>, paints a grim picture of inequality for charter schools in urban areas, where charter schools tend to serve the greatest number of students.</p> <p>The report takes a close look at the different types of revenue streams and how they close or widen funding gaps. Looking at 18 cities, it found the following:</p> <ul> <li>Following a recent surge in funding disparity between district and charter schools, the overall gap in these cities has reached $7,796 less per pupil if they attend a charter school—a 33% funding gap.</li> <li>For the eight cities tracked since 2003, the funding gap has more than doubled.</li> <li>Out of 18, six states receive a "C" or lower grade for overall funding equity.</li> <li>At the local level, only Tennessee’s Shelby County, which includes Memphis, received an "A" for equity. Atlanta and Little Rock, Arkansas were identified as the least equitable.</li> </ul> <p>State funding overall is the most equitable, and local funding is the least. Local funding disparities are not surprising given that many charter schools are their own school districts and have limited access to local tax dollars. These gaps have recently expanded and stand to only worsen as we enter into a recession and the likelihood of significant budget cuts.</p> <h3>Overview Charter School Funding Disparities by Funding Source</h3> <img alt="&quot;Funding Source &quot;&#9;&quot;Funding Gap per Student &quot;&#9;&quot;Funding Gap for Charter Schools&quot;&#9;Least Equitable (City)&#9;Most Equitable (City) Local&#9;($7,491) &#9;68% less&#9;Boston, MA &#9;Camden, NJ State&#9;($428) &#9;5% less&#9;Shelby County, TN &#9;Houston, TX Federal&#9;($654) &#9;37% less&#9;Washington, D.C.&#9;Boston, MA; Phoenix, AZ Nonpublic&#9;($1,412) &#9;46% less&#9;Los Angeles, CA; Little Rock, AR &#9;Washington, D.C. " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="d0127755-ac52-4c23-b947-d3870fbc4b46" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Inequity%20Surges%20in%20Cities%20Graphic.png" class="align-center" /> <h3>Dispelling Funding Myths: Demographics and Philanthropy</h3> <p>The report rebuts several arguments that are often used to dismiss funding disparities between charter schools and district-run public schools.</p> <p>One such argument is charter schools serve fewer students that require additional services, such as students with disabilities, and therefore one should expect that they receive less funding. After taking a closer look at special education expenditures, however, the study found that differences in special education populations only explained the funding gap in two cities out of the 18 in the report—Boston, MA and Shelby County, TN. In 10 cities it accounted for less than a third of the difference.</p> <p>The study also looked at the impact of demographics overall and found that the difference in low-income students enrolled in district schools and charter schools in this study was only 1% and thus would not explain funding differences. It's also worth noting charter schools serve more economically disadvantaged students nationwide (59%) than district schools (54%).</p> <p>It also provides evidence that contradicts a common perception that charter schools have access to larger pools of non-public funds, such as private philanthropy. Previous research by the authors shows private philanthropy is concentrated on only one-third of all charter schools. This most recent study demonstrates that philanthropy and other non-public sources of funds, such as food service fees and private donations, are not “filling the gap.” In fact, in some places they are widening the gap: Los Angeles, for example, shows a dramatic increase in non-public funding for district schools ($2,035 per student) fully accounts for their growing local funding gap.</p> <h3>Charter Schools Lack Equitable Access to Funding Increases</h3> <p>These gaps are not a result of funding cuts. Instead, the study finds that, for these 18 cities, they are a result of inequitable access to funding gains experienced by district schools. As one example, Denver charter schools experienced a dramatic increase in local funding inequity from $8,911 in 2016 to $15,445 in 2018 because of recent increases in local revenues that were not shared equitably with charter schools.</p> <p>It also raises significant questions about federal formulas intended to target Title I funds to high concentrations of poverty and whether charter schools are well served by them. The report doesn’t examine the role of LEA status and equitable allocations, but it would be interesting to see if there are lessons there for policymakers.</p> <h3>Are Charter Schools More Efficient?</h3> <p>While the report’s authors do not directly address this question, its findings raise important questions about educational efficiency. The report calculates that district schools in this study would have to trim $22 billion in revenue to equate charter school funding levels. Despite this, urban charter schools have been able to <a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/sites/default/files/documents/2020-06/CSP%20Annual%20Report%20_%20Final.pdf">produce significant achievement gains</a>, such as the gains found for students of color and English language learning students by CREDO, with significantly less funding.</p> <p class="text-align-center"><a href="https://ctt.ac/8g7r8"><img alt="Click to Tweet: &amp;quot;...district schools in this study would have to trim $22 billion in revenue to equate charter school funding levels." src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/1.png" width="350" /></a></p> <p>Ensuring all public schools have access to equitable resources that lead to a high-quality education is much more complex than simply trying to balance inputs between district and charter schools. Nevertheless, this report provides policymakers with an important lens on the potential impact of funding decisions, as well as the need for greater transparency in the allocation of funds to schools.</p> <h3>Conclusion</h3> <p>The compounding impact of different funding streams that are not allocated fairly between all public schools has a significant impact. Not just on charter schools, but on the students attending them.</p> <p>It is important for policymakers and state and local leaders to understand that state and local funding policies do not treat charter schools equitably. Moreover, unless federal funding accounts for this inequity—such as allocations related to the pandemic and Title I—the gaps could get worse and inequity can grow.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/research" hreflang="en">research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/charter-school-funding" hreflang="en">charter school funding</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <h2>Comments</h2> <div class="fb-comments" data-href="https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/12/03/study-analysis-charter-school-funding-gap-contributes-surging-inequity" data-width="100%" data-numposts="5"></div> </section> Thu, 03 Dec 2020 15:55:22 +0000 Melinda 24587 at https://www.publiccharters.org Breaking Down the Charter School Data Dashboard https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/10/26/breaking-down-charter-school-data-dashboard <span>Breaking Down the Charter School Data Dashboard</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/melinda" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Melinda</span></span> <span>Thu, 10/15/2020 - 09:48</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-author-bio field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/about-us/staff/yueting-cynthia-xu" hreflang="en">Yueting (Cynthia) Xu</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-10-26T12:00:00Z">October 26, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2020-10/Charter%20School%20Data%20Dashboard%20Blog%20%28250px%29.png?itok=DN7owgBP" width="250" height="250" alt="Charter School Data Dashboard image for blog post" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The Charter School Data Dashboard is the National Alliance’s first comprehensive online platform analyzing charter school data over time.</p> <p>On the Data Dashboard, researchers, school leaders, parents, and advocates will be able to obtain information on the size, growth, and locations of charter schools across the United States. Visitors also have a glimpse into the methodologies used to collect and handle the data from various administrative sources. The Data Dashboard can be used as the go-to resource when looking for the most recent data available on charter schools and will be updated regularly by the National Alliance research team.</p> <p>Here are a few tips on how to navigate the site:</p> <h3>Charter School Data Dashboard Landing Page</h3> <p>The main page of the Data Dashboard showcases national facts about charter schools along with data visualization of enrollment trends, school growth, locale, student demographics, and free and reduced lunch eligibility. These can be used to pull big-picture takeaways about charter schools and who they serve.</p> <p>To dig into more of the data, the four menu options—knowledge base, tables and figures, states, and the search feature—will get you what you need.</p> <h3>Charter School Data Knowledge Base</h3> <p>The knowledge base section of the site is where you’ll find the main articles and coinciding tables in the 2020 Charter School Data Digest. The page contains three parts—an overview of the digest and how to cite it, digestible excerpts from our research expanding on the data, and the tables and figures associated with the research.</p> <p>The main portion of the knowledge base, or charter school data digest, is where to find all our analyses on charter school enrollment share, serving population, locations, management and authorizers, and finance. Our methodologies used in the digest are also included.</p> <h3>Tables and Figures with Charter School and Student Data</h3> <p>We also know that some people may want to dig into the data on their own. With our tables and figures, you can filter the tables and figures by different subjects (e.g. enrollment, demographics, and locales) or by type (e.g. tables or maps). Each entry has its own dataset, methodology, and coordinating knowledge base article.</p> <h3>Charter School Data and Rankings by State</h3> <p>The main page of the state section provides an overview of state model law ranking and the number of charter schools and students in each state. More specific information on state charter school enrollment trends, student demographics, school and campus numbers, free and reduced lunch eligibility, and locales are provided on each of the individual state pages.</p> <p>On each individual state page, there’s a map tool you can use to find charter schools close to your location. Simply click the "Near Me" widget on the map header (the rightmost icon) and use the sliding scale to determine the distance range, you can view all charter schools in your desired range on the map. You can also use the filters to search results by school type: elementary, elementary-middle, elementary-high, middle, middle-high, and high school. Clicking on each school icon will give users access to more detailed information about each charter school.</p> <h3>Search Tool for the Data Dashboard</h3> <p>We know we have a lot of data here. To ensure you find exactly what you need, we’ve added a quick search function. The search function retrieves all the results from the data dashboard relevant to your search. Interested in learning more about management organizations? Type “management” into the search bar. Authorizer? We have that as well.</p> <p>Whatever you need it for or level of data you are interested in, the Charter School Data Dashboard is your one-stop-shop for all things charter school data. The Data Dashboard supports the on-going research on charter schools to ensure that all students have equitable access to a high-quality education.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>Yueting (Cynthia) Xu is the data specialist at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.</em></p> <p> </p> <blockquote> <h4>Explore the data for yourself on the updated <a href="https://data.publiccharters.org/"><strong>Charter School Data Dashboard</strong></a>.</h4> </blockquote></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/research" hreflang="en">research</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <h2>Comments</h2> <div class="fb-comments" data-href="https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/10/26/breaking-down-charter-school-data-dashboard" data-width="100%" data-numposts="5"></div> </section> Thu, 15 Oct 2020 13:48:01 +0000 Melinda 24313 at https://www.publiccharters.org 2020 Charter School Campus Report https://www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/2020-charter-school-campus-report <span>2020 Charter School Campus Report </span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/brittnee" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brittnee</span></span> <span>Tue, 09/22/2020 - 15:54</span> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2020-09/charter%20campus%20report%20image%202_1.png?itok=g13IT5zE" width="480" height="272" alt="2020 Charter School Campus Report" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Everyone knows what a school is, but the question of what constitutes an individual school is more complex than one would expect. Since not all individual records that appear in state or federal data files are schools, this creates a persistent challenge for educational researchers.</p> <p>In order to ensure that we have an accurate accounting of charter schools, the National Alliance uses a modified count system when we count charter schools. This white paper focuses on charter school campuses and explains why these records are found in datasets as well as when it might be more helpful to exclude these records from analyses.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-document field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><article class="media media-document view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-file field--type-file field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="pub-file-download"> <a class="btn btn-red" href="https://www.publiccharters.org/sites/default/files/documents/2020-09/2020%20Charter%20Campus%20Report%20Layout_4.pdf" target="_blank"><i class="fa fa-download"></i>Download Document</a> </div> </div> </article> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Publication Date</div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2020-09-22T12:00:00Z">09/22/2020</time> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Author</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/434" hreflang="en">Jamison White</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Publication Type</div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/76" hreflang="en">White Paper</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/research" hreflang="en">research</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 22 Sep 2020 19:54:59 +0000 Brittnee 24127 at https://www.publiccharters.org How the Digital Divide Impacts Charter School Students in the Age of COVID-19 https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/06/08/how-digital-divide-impacts-charter-school-students-age-covid-19 <span>How the Digital Divide Impacts Charter School Students in the Age of COVID-19 </span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/melinda" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Melinda</span></span> <span>Mon, 06/01/2020 - 16:17</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-author-bio field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/about-us/staff/adam-gerstenfeld" hreflang="en">Adam Gerstenfeld</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-06-08T12:00:00Z">June 8, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2020-06/Blog%20%28250px%29.png?itok=jAsT0ccC" width="250" height="250" alt="Graphic of laptop and phone" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span>Nationwide, approximately 9 million students lack access to connectivity or devices. This lack of access widens the already substantial gap between students from different socioeconomic backgrounds—and for charter school students that gap may be even more pronounced. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>After the coronavirus pandemic led to mass school closures, it quickly became clear that some students are at a disadvantage in digital learning—specifically those who are without access to the technology and internet connectivity that facilitates remote learning. The new normal in education is remote learning and if students don’t have the tools to learn remotely then achievement and attainment gaps based on income and race may be exacerbated.  </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>We found this particularly concerning and <a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/closing-digital-divide"><strong>sought to better understand</strong></a> the barriers students might face in accessing remote learning opportunities, especially considering charter schools serve a higher percentage of underserved students than district schools.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>To be certain, we needed to look at the data available. Here is what we found when we dug into the data:</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong>Almost a quarter of charter schools operate in low connectivity census tracts</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>While there is limited data available on student access to devices and connectivity at the school level, we can approximate by using the American Community Survey (ACS) and the census tract in which a school is located. We consider a census tract to have low access to devices or connectivity if a third or more households do not have access to any type of device or connectivity. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The first key finding is that a higher percentage of charter schools are located in census tracts with low connectivity—23 percent—as compared to district schools. This lends credence to our initial hypothesis that charter schools would be more affected by remote learning than other public schools due to the students they serve.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong>Charter school students are at least 2x more likely to be enrolled in a school located in a low device access area</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Another key finding is that there is a higher percentage of charter school students who attend schools in census tracts with low access to devices than those who attend district schools. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Unfortunately, the data is less compelling here because ACS data counts smartphones as devices which skews the numbers lower. Though if you’ve had to work on a smartphone, it isn’t easy. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong>Charter school students are less likely to access connectivity at high rates</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The ACS data also shows that charter school students are less likely than their district school counterparts to access connectivity at high rates. In 31 of the 44 states charter schools operate in, 20 percent or more of charter school students lack connectivity. This incidence of low access is more concentrated in certain states and cities. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>As a result of our findings and adding in the estimate of students in all schools—regardless of census tracts—our estimate is that charter schools need $243 million to address unmet device and connectivity needs for their students in a single school year. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>With the prevailing uncertainty around schools reopening and a question around whether they will have to close again, we can’t leave the digital divide unchecked. Our students deserve better.</span></span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><span><span><span><em>Nathan Barrett, Ph.D., is the senior director of research and evaluation at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. </em></span></span></span></p> <p><em>Adam Gerstenfeld is the manager of data and research at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.</em></p> <p> </p> <blockquote> <h4><span><span><span>Read the full report, <strong><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/closing-digital-divide">Closing the Digital Divide: What Policymakers Need to Know</a>.</strong></span></span></span></h4> </blockquote></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/covid-19" hreflang="en">COVID-19</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/research" hreflang="en">research</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <h2>Comments</h2> <div class="fb-comments" data-href="https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/06/08/how-digital-divide-impacts-charter-school-students-age-covid-19" data-width="100%" data-numposts="5"></div> </section> Mon, 01 Jun 2020 20:17:26 +0000 Melinda 17804 at https://www.publiccharters.org Closing the Digital Divide https://www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/closing-digital-divide <span>Closing the Digital Divide</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/3" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kim</span></span> <span>Fri, 05/29/2020 - 12:28</span> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2020-06/digital_divide_thumbnail.jpg?itok=hT1rQ4OM" width="480" height="272" alt="Digital Divide Thumbnail" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span>As the coronavirus pandemic shut down school buildings and moved education online, it quickly became clear that some students are at a disadvantage in digital learning—specifically those who are without access to the technology and internet connectivity that facilitates remote learning. In our new </span></span></span><span><span><span><span>white paper</span></span></span></span><span><span><span>, we use census data to better understand the barriers some students face. Among the findings? </span></span></span><span><span><span><span>More than 1 in 5 charter school students are in an area with low access to the internet</span></span></span></span><span><span><span>.</span></span></span></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-document field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><article class="media media-document view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-file field--type-file field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="pub-file-download"> <a class="btn btn-red" href="https://www.publiccharters.org/sites/default/files/documents/2020-06/napcs_digital_divide_rd6.pdf" target="_blank"><i class="fa fa-download"></i>Download Document</a> </div> </div> </article> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Publication Date</div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2020-06-08T12:00:00Z">06/08/2020</time> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Author</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/450" hreflang="en">Nathan Barrett, Ph.D.</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/435" hreflang="en">Adam Gerstenfeld</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Publication Type</div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/76" hreflang="en">White Paper</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/covid-19" hreflang="en">COVID-19</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/research" hreflang="en">research</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 29 May 2020 16:28:28 +0000 kim 17788 at https://www.publiccharters.org The Presidential Candidates Should Listen to Voters https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/01/28/presidential-candidates-should-listen-voters <span>The Presidential Candidates Should Listen to Voters</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/3" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kim</span></span> <span>Tue, 01/28/2020 - 12:02</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-01-28T12:00:00Z">January 28, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2020-01/blog%2001282020.png?itok=0hjVpWoI" width="250" height="250" alt="parent choice survey image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span>As we enter the election season, our attention turns to the voices of voters and the choices they make. In determining their choices, voters must weigh many issues—not only in importance, but how their preferences are represented by the various candidates. We know that <a href="https://news.gallup.com/poll/276932/several-issues-tie-important-2020-election.aspx">education is top of mind</a> for many, and even more so for Democrats, but we know less about current voter preferences on more complex issues within education. With the release of their annual <a href="https://www.federationforchildren.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/1-21-20-AFC-2020-National-Release-Memo-final.pdf">school choice poll</a>, the American Federation for Children (AFC) sought to address one of the more salient topics in education—school choice.    </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>School choice encompasses a range of policies and has been a part of American education long before the term was coined. While private schools are the type of choice that likely comes to mind for most, the ability to choose one’s school through housing decisions has long been a tool used by affluent families to seek out the best educational opportunities for their children. To address disparities in accessing choice, more recent school choice policies—such as charter schools, scholarships, and vouchers—have sought to provide options to less affluent families. The AFC poll shows that voters support these policies. Overall, more than two-thirds of likely voters say they support school choice. Though there are some differences, this support holds along racial, generational, and party lines, with no group dropping below a majority in favor of school choice.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>More specifically to charter schools, the report shows they remain favorable to many voters with 70% of voters supporting charter schools and only 26% in opposition. Additionally, a majority of voters would be less likely to vote for a candidate who wanted to eliminate all federal public charter school funding. This opposition is particularly pronounced among African-American and Latino voters and even holds with Democratic primary voters. Perhaps more telling is that only 11% of Democratic primary voters would be more likely to vote for a candidate that supported the elimination of all federal public charter school funding. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Half of the parents surveyed suggested that they would like a different option other than the district public school their child currently attends. When given the opportunity, people choose schools for their children for a variety of reasons, though parents indicated that academic issues were the top reason. The biggest draws for charter schools were academic quality and the ability to focus on students’ strengths. This is an important distinction as charter schools provide relief from the one-size-fits-all approach often seen in traditional district schools.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>There is no doubt that charter schools faced one of their most difficult years in the popular press. However, despite some shoddy research, calls for moratoriums, and political pandering, the lived experiences of families searching for options in the education of their children are what’s influencing their opinions. <a>Rather than trying to influence voters about what’s right and wrong for them and their children’s education, politicians should start listening. </a></span></span></span></p> <p><em><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/about-us/staff/nathan-barrett-phd"><strong>Nathan Barrett, Ph.D.</strong></a>, is the senior director of research and evaluation at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.</em></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/research" hreflang="en">research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/national-school-choice-week" hreflang="en">National School Choice Week</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <h2>Comments</h2> <div class="fb-comments" data-href="https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/01/28/presidential-candidates-should-listen-voters" data-width="100%" data-numposts="5"></div> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-310" class="comment js-comment"> <div> <h3> <a href="/comment/310#comment-310" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Parent Perspectives</a> </h3> <div class="metabar"> <div class="metabar__item">January 30, 2020 - 11:26pm</div> <div class="metabar__item"><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Rikki Hatfield</span></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Excellent post! I just completed a mixed-methods case study in North Carolina. The charter school enrollment continues to grow in North Carolina and I decided to study the contributing factors influencing parents to leave traditional public schools and choose a charter school. As parents arm themselves with information, they become more influential stakeholders in the educational policies. While charter schools continue to be the center of the political debates, politicians may want to review statistical data before they are quick to push for the abolishment of charter schools. North Carolina is on track to have 200 approved charters by 2021.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=310&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="3LDZNBHbYi3Qw1jcjiFCrMNddCzGHbV5U2ZDHUlu7nw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </article> </section> Tue, 28 Jan 2020 17:02:06 +0000 kim 16789 at https://www.publiccharters.org Five Takeaways from the Latest Teacher Survey https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/01/24/five-takeaways-latest-teacher-survey <span>Five Takeaways from the Latest Teacher Survey</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/3" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kim</span></span> <span>Fri, 01/24/2020 - 09:29</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-author-bio field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/about-us/staff/kim-mccabe" hreflang="en">Kim McCabe</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-01-24T12:00:00Z">January 24, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2020-01/feel-valued_square_1.png?itok=zjkT4BA3" width="250" height="250" alt="Charter Teachers Feel Valued" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span>This week, Educators for Excellence released their <strong><a href="https://e4e.org/news/survey-americas-educators/voices-classroom-2020-survey-americas-educators">2020 Teacher Survey</a></strong> and I was thrilled to see how they featured the breakout of charter school teacher responses this year. Scroll down for my top five takeaways from this year’s report!</span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong>Charter school teachers feel more valued.</strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span>The poll found that charter school teachers are 22 percentage points more likely to say they feel “very valued”—that’s incredible! Need some ideas for how to better support the teachers are your school? Last year we shared the <strong><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/sites/default/files/documents/2019-10/PI-talent-r4.pdf">best practices on building an effective staff</a> </strong>from three successful charter school leaders. </span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong>Charter school teachers are well-trained.</strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span>Charter school teachers were more likely to report that they received training in areas including engaging parents, supporting students social and emotional well-being, understanding policy issues, and delivering culturally responsive instruction. (By the way, we love offering these types of professional development opportunities at the <strong><a href="https://ncsc.publiccharters.org/">National Charter Schools Conference</a></strong>, so if you’re looking to add some skills I hope you’ll join us in Orlando!)</span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong>Charter school teachers are prepared for the classroom.</strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span>I love reading stories about innovative teacher training programs that involve time in actual classrooms (<strong><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/07/30/how-idea-public-schools-creating-best-their-scholars">like this program at IDEA Public Schools</a></strong>) so I was happy to see 37 percent of charter school teachers report that they felt their preparation programs trained them “very well” for the realities of the classroom (compared to only 9% of district teachers).</span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong>Charter school teachers are active in selecting curricula.</strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span>One of the most compelling charter school teacher stories I’ve heard was from a teacher who described how she was able to make decisions about her students’ reading materials AFTER she met her students for the year. So I wasn’t surprised to hear that charter school teachers reported they played an active role in choosing the curricula for their classrooms. If you’re looking for good options, several charter networks have started to<strong> <a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/03/21/can-good-curriculum-transcend-charter-district-divide">share their curricula</a></strong>!</span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong>All teachers support school choice.</strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span>Nearly all of the teachers surveyed—96 percent!—support some form of school choice. A majority of the teachers surveyed, both district and charter, support school choice when it embodies many of the qualities of charter schools: equally accessible to all students, doesn’t shift funds from public schools, doesn’t discriminate against students, and increases academic achievement for low-income students. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>With so many charter schools offering a great work environment for teachers, it’s no surprise that our <strong><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/job-board">Charter School Job Board</a></strong> is one of our most popular web pages. If you want to join the charter teachers who reported feeling valued, prepared, and engaged, I encourage you to check out some of the job postings!</span></span></span></p> <p><em><span><span><span><strong><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/about-us/staff/kim-mccabe">Kim McCabe</a></strong> is the senior director of communications at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. </span></span></span></em></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/research" hreflang="en">research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/teachers" hreflang="en">teachers</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <h2>Comments</h2> <div class="fb-comments" data-href="https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/01/24/five-takeaways-latest-teacher-survey" data-width="100%" data-numposts="5"></div> </section> Fri, 24 Jan 2020 14:29:50 +0000 kim 16634 at https://www.publiccharters.org Newark Test Scores Take Charter School Critics Head On https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/01/22/newark-test-scores-take-charter-school-critics-head <span>Newark Test Scores Take Charter School Critics Head On</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/3" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kim</span></span> <span>Wed, 01/22/2020 - 14:23</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-01-22T12:00:00Z">January 22, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2020-01/Blog%2001222020.png?itok=42lAY-Ly" width="250" height="250" alt="Newark Charter School Students Taking Test" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span>The stock of rigorous studies demonstrating the positive effects of charter schools on student achievement just became a little larger with the release of The Manhattan Institute’s latest report, <a href="https://www.manhattan-institute.org/charter-school-effectiveness-newark-new-jersey">Charter Schools in Newark: The Effect on Student Test Scores</a>, looking at Newark, N.J. This is important news as charter school expansion was a major part of the city’s reform efforts that began in 2010. In addition to accountability for all schools, these major reforms included a common enrollment system that allowed parents to apply to many schools (both charter and traditional) in one place rather than each school separately. Marcus Winters—the study’s author, an associate professor at Boston University, and a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute—leveraged the city’s common enrollment system and the deferred acceptance lottery-based assignment mechanism to provide plausibly causal estimates of the effect of enrolling in a public charter school on math and ELA test scores. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The study finds that enrolling in a charter school has large positive effects on both math and English language arts (ELA) test scores. The effects are sustained in each of the three years of study and are roughly equivalent to a 2% increase in lifetime earnings. The study also finds that these effects are consistent across traditionally disadvantaged populations. Finally, the study demonstrates that these gains are larger in KIPP and Uncommon schools.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Critics often argue that positive findings on student performance in charter schools are not because charter schools are any better, but because they enroll different types of students—making it easier to produce gains—and that they push out poor-performing students to inflate test scores. This report directly addresses both criticisms. The author’s approach ensured that the students in his study had similar observable characteristics such as prior achievement and disadvantage, and likely similar non-observable characteristics such as parent engagement. Plausibly, the only difference is that one student went to a charter school and the other did not. This study also measures later outcomes for students regardless if they remain in the charter school. Because the effects are sustained throughout the study period it is highly unlikely that schools are pushing out students to generate positive outcomes.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>And, this study combats another common criticism—that the presence of charter schools puts fiscal pressure on district schools and results in poorer outcomes for students in traditional district schools. A quick scan of the New Jersey Department of Education’s website shows that operational spending per pupil was <a href="https://www.nj.gov/education/guide/2016/">somewhat higher</a> to <a href="https://www.nj.gov/education/guide/2017/">roughly the same</a> in Newark’s traditional district schools than its charter schools, suggesting that the presence of charter schools is not having an undue influence on the resources available to the district. <a href="https://rc.doe.state.nj.us/runreport.aspx?type=district&amp;county=13&amp;district=3570&amp;year=2016-2017">District-wide performance</a> that the traditional district schools are improving, which is consistent with <a href="https://cepr.harvard.edu/files/cepr/files/newark_ed_reform_report_synopsis.pdf">earlier studies</a> that evaluated the overall reform effects on all schools in Newark. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>This study shows that good things are happening in Newark’s charter schools in terms of student achievement. Coupled with other evidence, there is reason to believe that the presence of charter schools and the policies that support accountability and access for all public schools in Newark have created an educational environment that can support students in both traditional public and public charter schools.</span></span></span></p> <p><em><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/about-us/staff/nathan-barrett-phd"><strong>Nathan Barrett, Ph.D.</strong></a>, is the senior director of research and evaluation at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.</em></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/research" hreflang="en">research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/student-performance" hreflang="en">student performance</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <h2>Comments</h2> <div class="fb-comments" data-href="https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/01/22/newark-test-scores-take-charter-school-critics-head" data-width="100%" data-numposts="5"></div> </section> Wed, 22 Jan 2020 19:23:04 +0000 kim 16603 at https://www.publiccharters.org 2019 Modified Count Report https://www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/2019-modified-count-report <span>2019 Modified Count Report</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/melinda" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Melinda</span></span> <span>Mon, 12/02/2019 - 15:44</span> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2019-12/mod-count-report.png?itok=SSSY6siD" width="480" height="272" alt="2019 Modified Count Report graphic" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>No exact definition of what constitutes a “school” exists. This lack of standardization can be problematic when accounting for schools in data systems and maintaining consistent data across time because federal and state educational agencies use different definitions for schools. This paper looks at the various record types found in state and federal datasets and details how the National Alliances <span><span>developed the modified count process</span></span> of schools to better reflect the realities on the ground.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-document field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><article class="media media-document view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-file field--type-file field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="pub-file-download"> <a class="btn btn-red" href="https://www.publiccharters.org/sites/default/files/documents/2019-12/Modified-Count-2.pdf" target="_blank"><i class="fa fa-download"></i>Download Document</a> </div> </div> </article> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Publication Date</div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2019-12-16T12:00:00Z">12/16/2019</time> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Author</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/434" hreflang="en">Jamison White</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Publication Type</div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/76" hreflang="en">White Paper</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/research" hreflang="en">research</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 02 Dec 2019 20:44:29 +0000 Melinda 16171 at https://www.publiccharters.org Three Takeaways for Charter Schools from the 2019 School in America Report https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/12/06/three-takeaways-charter-schools-2019-school-america-report <span>Three Takeaways for Charter Schools from the 2019 School in America Report</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/melinda" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Melinda</span></span> <span>Thu, 12/05/2019 - 15:05</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-author-bio field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/about-us/staff/adam-gerstenfeld" hreflang="en">Adam Gerstenfeld</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2019-12-06T12:00:00Z">December 6, 2019</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2019-12/EdChoice%20Schooling%202019%20research%20blog%20post.png?itok=MYQZRmrK" width="250" height="250" alt="Photo of student in charter school classroom" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span>Over the last few years, public charter schools have faced increasing hostility in state and federal legislatures and in the media. A once bipartisan issue has become emblematic of partisan politics, highlighted by the release of several anti-charter platforms <span><span><span><span>from candidates for the </span></span></span></span>Democratic presidential nomination. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>While choice in education has become more polarizing, the release of EdChoice’s seventh annual </span><a href="https://www.edchoice.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/2019-9-Schooling-in-America-by-Paul-Diperna-Andrew-Catt-and-Michael-Shaw-1.pdf"><span>report on public opinion of schooling</span></a><span> suggests that students and their families have maintained solid support for charter schools.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>Here are a few things we learned on parent opinion and charter schools:</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span>Parents are more satisfied with charter schools</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>The report shows parents who have enrolled their children in a charter school are more satisfied with that choice (77%) than families who have enrolled their children in a district school (67%).  This has been a consistent and widening trend over the last several reports. In general, parents—regardless of where they send their children to school—are more likely to rate charter schools with an “A” or a “B” (61%), than they are to rate district schools with an “A” or a “B” (48%).  </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>Bottom line: parents want choice in their communities—and when given that choice, they are usually satisfied with the results.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span>Parents are choosing charter schools for a reason</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>The report also lists reasons why parents turn to charter schools. According to the survey results, the top three reasons why parents choose charters are their academic reputation (32%), proximity to home/work (28%), and a safe environment (27%). For comparison, proximity to home/work (49%), assigned school (37%), and peers/socialization (32%) are the top three reasons parents indicated they choose a district school.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>While parents may have opted to live in the area of the district school in question, the fact that over a third stated that their decision was due to assignment rather than active choice suggests that there may be unmet demand for charter schools. This is underscored by the fact that real-world enrollments do not match parents’ first choice for enrollment:13 percent of parents said sending their children to charter schools would be their first choice, even though only 5 percent of parents surveyed actually had a child in a charter school.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span>Increased knowledge of charter schools leads to increased support</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>Additionally, the report highlights a key aspect of the debate on charter schools—as people become more informed about what charter schools are, their approval for them increases. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>This year reflected the highest support for public charter schools since the report’s inception. When given a description on charter schools, public support ticks up by 13 points, to a 64% approval rating. Teacher support increases to majority support after a description, up six points to 55%. Current school-age parent approval rating hits the highest mark of all with almost 70% of parents favoring charter schools after hearing a definition. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>This is part of a growing trend we see with charter schools—as people learn more about them and experience them, support grows. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>Taken together, these three takeaways show that parents want more educational opportunities for their children and, as charter schools continue to receive negative attention in media and political arenas, it is important that charter school advocates voice their support and take opportunities to counter misconceptions and misinformation. Charter schools have a unique opening to show they are putting student needs first—and advocates should take this opportunity to provide an accurate picture of the school choice landscape.</span></span></span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><span><span><span><span><em><strong><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/about-us/staff/adam-gerstenfeld">Adam Gerstenfeld</a> </strong>is the manager, data and research for the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.</em></span></span></span></span></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/research" hreflang="en">research</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <h2>Comments</h2> <div class="fb-comments" data-href="https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/12/06/three-takeaways-charter-schools-2019-school-america-report" data-width="100%" data-numposts="5"></div> </section> Thu, 05 Dec 2019 20:05:10 +0000 Melinda 16200 at https://www.publiccharters.org