National Charter Schools Week https://www.publiccharters.org/tags/national-charter-schools-week en National Alliance Honors U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander with the Charter Schools Lifetime Achievement Award https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/05/13/national-alliance-honors-us-senator-lamar-alexander-charter-schools-lifetime <span>National Alliance Honors U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander with the Charter Schools Lifetime Achievement Award</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/reed" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reed</span></span> <span>Fri, 05/08/2020 - 16:26</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/press-release" hreflang="en">Press Release</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-05-13T12:00:00Z">May 13, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Washington, D.C.</strong> – Today the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools (National Alliance) announced it will give the prestigious Charter Schools Lifetime Achievement Award to U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN), as part of continued celebrations during National Charter Schools Week. Since the award’s inception there have only been two other recipients, Dr. Wyatt Tee Walker, former chief of staff to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (2016) and former President Bill Clinton (2011). </p> <p>Senator Alexander was first recognized by the National Alliance as a “Champion for Charters” in 2007. As Chair of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) committee and a member of the Senate appropriations committee, Senator Alexander understands the value of charter schools and works hard to ensure more students have access to a high-quality public-school option. Senator Alexander’s leadership inspired his staff and other colleagues to lead legislative initiatives and resolutions that strengthened the charter school sector. Senator Alexander has champion charter schools since they were created and his clarity around providing high quality education options today makes him an invaluable leader in education equity.</p> <p>“There are thousands of passionate advocates, administrators and teachers in our movement, but the work of Senator Alexander to provide all students with access to a high-quality public school is second to none,” said Nina Rees, president and CEO of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. “Senator Alexander is leaving an impressive legacy: No child’s destiny should be determined by their zip code. After decades of being a steadfast champion of charter schools, it is an honor to present our highest award, the Charter Schools Lifetime Achievement Award, to Senator Alexander.”</p> <p>"I was around for the start of charter schools,” U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander said<strong>.</strong> “I remember the Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party in Minnesota created the first dozen or so start-from-scratch schools, and then President George H.W. Bush—through his U.S. Department of Education—encouraged those new American schools, start-from-scratch schools. Then, as he left office, and I left office as U.S. Secretary of Education, I wrote every school district and asked them to create one of those new start-from-scratch, public charter schools. And, look where we've come today — seven percent of all public schools in America are charter schools. That means more freedom for teachers. That means more choices for parents and for children. The thing I like best about it is that over the years it's been a bipartisan effort. So, it's been a great thirty years for the teachers, for the parents and for the students. Let's make it another great thirty years and see where we can take this country.”</p> <p>"Senator Alexander has a long history of advocacy on behalf of charter schools," said Maya Bugg, CEO of the Tennessee Charter School Center. "Senator Alexander’s support has been crucial for the growth of high-quality charter schools across Tennessee and the more than 38,000 students they serve. We thank him for his championing of charter schools over the years."    </p> <p>The Charter Schools Lifetime Achievement Award is granted to extraordinary individuals who devote tireless passion in support of charter schools and dedicate their lives to accomplishing significant results for the charter school movement. This honor is awarded to contributors who have had a lasting and fundamental impact on, not only charter schools, but the education system as a whole. The awardee is someone who has demonstrated an unparalleled commitment to the cause, and whose numerous achievements have been acknowledged by charter school advocates, their professional peers, and the general public.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/national-charter-schools-week" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Week</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/nina-rees" hreflang="en">Nina Rees</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/lifetime-achievement-award" hreflang="en">Lifetime Achievement Award</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/champions-charters" hreflang="en">Champions for Charters</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 08 May 2020 20:26:31 +0000 Reed 17646 at https://www.publiccharters.org Ten Charter Schools Honored with Above and Beyond Awards for Outstanding Service During COVID-19 Pandemic https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/05/12/ten-charter-schools-honored-above-and-beyond-awards-outstanding-service <span>Ten Charter Schools Honored with Above and Beyond Awards for Outstanding Service During COVID-19 Pandemic</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/reed" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reed</span></span> <span>Fri, 05/08/2020 - 15:25</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/press-release" hreflang="en">Press Release</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-05-12T12:00:00Z">May 12, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Washington, D.C.</strong> – Today, the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools (National Alliance) is honoring 10 charter schools from across America with inaugural Above and Beyond Awards as part of celebrations for National Charter Schools Week (May 10-16). While all charter schools showed exemplary commitment to their students by rapidly transitioning to distance learning this spring, and most offered additional supports like meals and hardware, these schools went to remarkable lengths to meet the needs of not only their students, but the families of their students, and their larger communities in the face of the pandemic. We are proud of the innovative and altruistic ways charter schools are showing up for students and communities—and these efforts have inspired this year’s National Charter Schools Week theme, “Above and Beyond.”</p> <p>“When charter schools nationwide transitioned to distance learning, it became clear to us that charter schools were setting a model for the rest of the nation on what it looked like to step up and care for their communities in the face of a global pandemic,” said Nina Rees, president and CEO of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. “There are many public schools that served their students well in the face of COVID-19, but the exceptional work of our Above and Beyond Award winners embodies compassion and caring for people outside their school community who also needed help. Their work is a model of servant leadership for the rest of the nation.”</p> <p><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/about-charter-schools/charter-school-trailblazers/2020-above-and-beyond-awards"><strong>Above and Beyond Award Honorees</strong></a></p> <ul> <li>Baxter Academy for Technology and Science, Portland, ME</li> <li>Common Ground High School, New Haven, CT</li> <li>Discovery Charter School, Rochester, NY</li> <li>DSST Public Schools, Denver, CO</li> <li>Harmony Public Charter Schools, Houston, TX</li> <li>Impact Public Schools, Seattle, WA</li> <li>KIPP Columbus, Columbus, OH</li> <li>Palms West Charter School, Loxahatchee, FL</li> <li>Raul Yzaguirre Schools for Success, Houston, TX</li> <li>Spring Charter Schools, Riverside County, CA</li> </ul> <p>The National Charter Schools Week 2020 theme, “Above and Beyond,” speaks to the extraordinary work all charter schools are doing during the pandemic. To join us in celebrating this week, share photos and videos of charter school parents, students and supporters with the schools and the National Alliance on social media. On Twitter tag the school and @charteralliance, and hashtag #CharterSchoolsWeek and #AboveandBeyond.</p> <p>For questions regarding today’s announcement, please reach out to <a href="mailto:shaelyn@publiccharters.org">shaelyn@publiccharters.org</a>. For information on National Charter Schools Week please <a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/what-you-can-do/celebrate-national-charter-schools-week">visit us online</a>.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/national-charter-schools-week" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Week</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/nina-rees" hreflang="en">Nina Rees</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 08 May 2020 19:25:35 +0000 Reed 17645 at https://www.publiccharters.org National Charter Schools Week Celebrates Charter Schools Going Above and Beyond to Meet the Needs of Nearly 3.3 Million Students During the Pandemic https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/05/11/national-charter-schools-week-celebrates-charter-schools-going-above-and <span>National Charter Schools Week Celebrates Charter Schools Going Above and Beyond to Meet the Needs of Nearly 3.3 Million Students During the Pandemic</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/reed" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reed</span></span> <span>Fri, 05/08/2020 - 15:22</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/press-release" hreflang="en">Press Release</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-05-11T12:00:00Z">May 11, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Washington, D.C</strong>. – Today, the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools (National Alliance) kicks off National Charter Schools Week (NSCW) (May 10-16) celebrating the nearly 7,500 public charter schools and campuses across the nation. NCSW exists to celebrate charter schools, the high-quality, tuition-free public-schools that nearly 3.3 million students across America depend on for an excellent education. During NCSW celebrations we will highlight schools, students, education leaders, policymakers, and advocates that have demonstrated the strength and resilience of the charter school movement as the nation was forced to rapidly transition to a new normal, in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Public schools have been placed at the center of support and relief efforts and charter schools showed their best selves. By enabling distance learning, providing technology to students, and providing meals and countless other services to the community, charter schools did whatever was needed.</p> <p>“In the face of this pandemic, the inequities facing America’s most underserved students have never been clearer,” said Nina Rees, president and CEO of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. “Issues like the homework gap, the digital divide, food insecurity and under-resourced schools are even more prominent now. Charter schools have prioritized not only meeting the academic needs of their students, but the holistic needs of their students’ families and their communities. We applaud their efforts to go above and beyond and stand in solidarity with the estimated five million students who would attend a charter school if one were available to them. As the pandemic continues to spotlight the inequities within our public education system, we hope National Charter Schools Week is a reminder to policymakers that charter schools are a beacon of light for millions of our nation’s students and families.”</p> <p>This year’s theme, “Above and Beyond”, honors charter schools who have done extraordinary work to serve their students, the families of their students and others in the community during the pandemic.</p> <p><strong>Monday, May 11: Join Us in National Charter Schools Week Celebrations</strong><br /> Celebrate the great work charter schools are doing in their communities with us online! Check out the NSCW proclamation from the <a href="https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/proclamation-national-charter-schools-week-2020/?utm_campaign=Charter%20Schools%20Week%202020&amp;utm_source=hs_email&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8O1z3a9j760ujakAkyCNImOi6MhEcMODPfRRuOBnFvLUcpjmZNKM9xbUhAsflVJOrQST1A">White House</a> and join the conversation on social media using the hashtags #CharterSchoolsWeek and #CharterLove to share how charter schools are going above and beyond to serve the needs of students and the larger community. Charter schools are encouraged to use the <a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/what-you-can-do/celebrate-national-charter-schools-week">NCSW 2020 toolkit</a> with turnkey tools that make it easy for charter schools, charter management organizations, and partners to recognize and amplify the great work of charter schools.</p> <p><strong>Tuesday, May 12: Above and Beyond Awards </strong><br /> The National Alliance is recognizing 10 schools as recipients of our first-ever Above and Beyond Awards. The awards will be given to outstanding charter schools that performed exceptional work for their students and their communities during the COVID-19 pandemic.</p> <p><strong>Wednesday, May 13: Charter Schools Lifetime Achievement Award</strong><br /> Join the National Alliance in celebrating one U.S. Senator who will be recognized for a lifetime of efforts to provide a high-quality public school to every child. Stay tuned to learn who the National Alliance’s 2020 Charter Schools Lifetime Achievement Award winner is. Since the award’s inception there have only been two other recipients, Dr. Wyatt Tee Walker, former chief of staff to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (2016) and former President Bill Clinton (2011). </p> <p><strong>Thursday, May 14: Webinar: A Community-wide Coordinated Response in the Time of Crisis</strong><br /> You are invited to a <a href="https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_VFOPgLicQp-uuuqJqEDz-Q?utm_campaign=Charter%20Schools%20Week%202020&amp;utm_source=hs_email&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8O1z3a9j760ujakAkyCNImOi6MhEcMODPfRRuOBnFvLUcpjmZNKM9xbUhAsflVJOrQST1A">webinar</a> hosted by the National Alliance, that will recognize this year’s Above and Beyond Award honorees and include a thoughtful discussion about how public schools can partner with one another and serve their communities in times of crisis. The webinar will include remarks by former U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu and a moderated discussion with education leaders from New Orleans. An open Q&amp;A session will follow.</p> <p><strong>Friday, May 15: “I Love Charter Schools” Spirit Day</strong><br /> NCSW will conclude with an “I Love Charter Schools” spirit day to wrap up our #CharterLove campaign. Be sure to tag @charteralliance on social media with photos and videos of students, teachers, and charter school advocates showing love for these innovative public schools.</p> <p>Now in its 20th year, National Charter Schools Week was first declared by President Clinton. Although the growth of public charter schools began under President Clinton, Presidents Bush, Obama, and Trump have all continued this national, public commendation of charter schools.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/national-charter-schools-week" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Week</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/nina-rees" hreflang="en">Nina Rees</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 08 May 2020 19:22:58 +0000 Reed 17643 at https://www.publiccharters.org 5 Ways to Reimagine Education at the National Charter Schools Conference https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/05/17/5-ways-reimagine-education-national-charter-schools-conference <span>5 Ways to Reimagine Education at the National Charter Schools Conference</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/melinda" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Melinda</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/15/2019 - 12:25</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-author-bio field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/about-us/staff/patricia-guidetti" hreflang="en">Patricia Guidetti</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2019-05-17T12:00:00Z">May 17, 2019</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2019-05/NCSC19%20Charter%20Schools%20are%20Reimagining%20Education_0.png?itok=0bzAUbUE" width="250" height="250" alt="NCSC19 Charter Schools are Reimagining Education blog post feature image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span>As we wrap up another successful <span><span><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/what-you-can-do/celebrate-national-charter-schools-week">National Charter Schools Week</a></span></span>, we want to acknowledge the incredible educators who give 100% of themselves each day to their students. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Innovation is not just for students. The National Alliance is constantly looking for new ways for teachers, principals, administrators, board members, and all leaders to learn and network with their peers at the one event that brings them all together. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>We’ve challenged ourselves this year to reimagine the education that attendees get at the <span><span><a href="https://ncsc.publiccharters.org/">2019 National Charter Schools Conference</a></span></span> with new initiatives to enhance the conference experience and embrace the theme: “Reimagining Education.”</span></span></p> <p><strong><span><span>1. Homeroom</span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span>Birds of a feather flock together, and this year, we’re providing you with a nest by introducing Homeroom as a space for conference attendees to calmly start their day and build community with likeminded individuals.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Each morning conference attendees can choose a different homeroom to attend with a theme: Monday’s themes are special interests (think: solo attendees, rural schools, under 30), Tuesday will group everyone by career track (calling all teacher leaders to room 19!), and Wednesday will be by region to connect with those closest to home. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Participants can collaborate, brainstorm new ideas, and solve some of the most pressing issues facing charter schools in the form of scenarios. We’ll also provide sessions and activities for attendees to participate in throughout the conference related to each homeroom to help attendees focus on the content that best meets their interests.</span></span></p> <p><strong><span><span>2. Living Library</span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span>Opportunities to problem-solving and network are two of the top reasons attendees come to the National Charter Schools Conference. There are hundreds of experts attending the conference with the right advice to help you and your team tackle some of your biggest challenges. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>But finding the right people and arranging the time can be difficult. We want to help you connect with these experts, which is why we have developed our living library—a designated area in the conference space that allows for attendees to “check out” our human experts for a 15-minute one-on-one to pick their brains on a specific topic. </span></span></p> <p><strong><span><span>3. Charter Talks</span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span>Not everyone learns the same way, so in recent years we’ve expanded our opportunities to learn with our Charter Talks lounge. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Now in its third year, attendees can hear from experts in inspiring 15-minute presentations that get to the crux of issues. These sessions continue to grow in quality each year and we are proud to provide these TED Talks-style sessions for our attendees. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>These compelling presentations follow a story arc to deliver a big idea, dive deep into an issue, or spotlight a small idea with a big impact. Charter Talks provide a different way to learn and engage with peers.</span></span></p> <p><strong><span><span>4. Wellness Area</span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span>Mental and physical wellness is a hot topic in education and not just for students. It is important for educators to take care of themselves and model good habits in their students. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>In our wellness area, attendees will be able to participate in hourly meditation and yoga practices as well as daily mindfulness workshops. We’ll also have therapy dogs—because research shows that animals can help you relax and reset (and who are we to argue with that!?).</span></span></p> <p><strong><span><span>5. Podcasts</span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span>Podcasting is not new, but we will bring two great podcasts to the National Charter Schools Conference for the first time. </span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><a href="https://audioboom.com/channels/4984227">8<strong> </strong>Black<strong> </strong>Hands</a></span></span> and Academica Media’s <span><span><a href="https://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/charter-school-superstars-academica-media-YZqPp0slLS5/">Charter School Superstars</a></span></span> will record live from the Charter Talks stage. Take this opportunity to meet and network with the podcasters, see what happens behind the scenes, and engage with others who have similar interests.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>There are plenty of opportunities to network and problem-solve at the National Charter Schools Conference to reimagine education well beyond these five examples. It is our goal to change the way educators learn, empower their creativity, and inspire them to go back to their schools and reimagine the education that happens in their classrooms.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Let’s keep the momentum going from National Charter Schools Week!</span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><span><span><span><span><strong><em><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/about-us/staff/patricia-guidetti">Patricia Guidetti</a></em></strong></span></span><em> is the director of programs at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.</em></span></span></p> <p> </p> <blockquote> <h4><span><span><span><span><strong><a href="https://conference.publiccharters.org/2019/registration/">Join us in Las Vegas</a></strong></span></span>, June 30-July 3, at the National Charter Schools Conference!</span></span></h4> </blockquote></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/national-charter-schools-week" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Week</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/national-charter-schools-conference" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Conference</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=14322&amp;2=field_comments&amp;3=comment" token="U2JdL-XDzL8DAbI_lmdNtjQHmPdDOCkOTZrKUGvxkdg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Wed, 15 May 2019 16:25:42 +0000 Melinda 14322 at https://www.publiccharters.org Charter Schools: Reimagining through Conversation https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/05/17/charter-schools-reimagining-through-conversation <span>Charter Schools: Reimagining through Conversation</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/melinda" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Melinda</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/14/2019 - 17:11</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-author-bio field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/about-us/jerilyn-olson" hreflang="en">Jerilyn Olson</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2019-05-17T12:00:00Z">May 17, 2019</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2019-05/Jerilyn%20Olsen.png?itok=B-lv5GCb" width="250" height="250" alt="Jerilyn Olsen, Great Hearts Academies" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span>The theme of this year’s </span></span></span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://ncsc.publiccharters.org/">National Charter School Conference</a></span></span></span></span><span><span><span> (NCSC) is “Reimagining Education” and in June our greater charter school family will gather from across the nation to hear how each of us are doing just this.  </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>As a network of K-12 academies serving nearly 18,000 students in Arizona and Texas with a classical education, the </span></span></span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://www.greatheartsamerica.org/">Great Hearts Academies</a></span></span></span></span><span><span><span> approach might seem out of place in “reimagining education.”  A classical education after all, starts with a respect for the great ideas of the past. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>But a classical education offers a unique perspective to the innovation conversation. We believe that to “reimagine education,” we must first carefully study the images of education created across a rich tradition</span></span></span><span><span><span> —</span></span></span><span><span><span>for we have to acknowledge that the conversation began long before us. Then, with this greater vision in mind, we return to our present context to grapple with how lasting truths find new life serving our communities of today—to bring to a new generation the knowledge and experiences of beauty that were once reserved for society’s elite. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>At Great Hearts, we commit to cultivating renaissance women and men who can see the big picture</span></span></span><span><span><span> —</span></span></span><span><span><span>who can listen, write, and speak well. These students have strong character and have a keen eye and ear for what’s true and what matters. Some call this critical thinking, but when aligned to the search for truth, the ancients simply called this wisdom. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Heroes throughout history have done this. Consider Martin Luther King Jr., whose education in classical rhetoric equipped him to speak powerfully. It enabled him to effectively address the injustices of his day and to win the hearts of men and women. Dr. King drew from conversations before him and boldly brought his own voice to it.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><img alt="Great Hearts Academies classroom" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="2fc1037b-e01e-4909-97ac-40edb38cbbc4" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/General%20Graphic%20%281200%C3%97600%29.png" /></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>At Great Hearts, we study Dr. King’s words, amongst other powerful orators, to draw on their wisdom to equip students for the work of today. We use the </span></span></span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://www.criticalthinking.org/pages/socratic-teaching/606">Socratic method</a></span></span></span></span><span><span><span> to unleash our students’ sense of wonder while simultaneously developing their capacity for deep reflection, problem-solving, and a taste for the true, the good and the beautiful. And we do this in all disciplines. When captured by the beauty of mathematics, for instance, students will find the eventual application of the subject more profound. In our newly created logic and coding course for seniors, students begin with the ancient study of Aristotelian logic and progress through its application to the modern computer. But again, at the heart of all of this, we believe that the best ideas that have arisen across time often have been the result of conversation. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>What I have found is that NCSC provides that space these types of conversation. At past NCSC conferences,  I worked with colleagues late into the night in various hotel lobbies and restaurants to recap sessions we attended. These informal conversations give us a chance to react to ideas presented at the conference, and dream of how we would take the ideas and make them our own. We wrestled with ideas presented earlier in the day and reimagined them in our own context</span></span></span><span><span><span>—</span></span></span><span><span><span>thinking of the unique student populations we each serve.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>NCSC has always been a place where in one moment we stumbled upon close friends doing very similar work and in the next moment we were challenged deeply in a session by colleagues who saw things very differently. Yet, we feel united by the fundamental belief that families should be provided with excellent options for their children,. As the Hebrew proverb notes, “iron sharpens iron.”</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>That’s why I’m particularly honored to serve on the NCSC planning committee this year. I am compelled by the great need for national collaboration. I love thinking about how special this opportunity is for the annual conference to support and unite the incredible work of individual regions, networks, and schools. We must ask, what voices ought to be highlighted and what practices should be considered? Who will prompt the right conversations among our incredibly talented teachers, school leaders, and colleagues in our common work, to transform the American public education system?</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>This year’s programming will not disappoint. From the most current topics that are fresh on the mind</span></span></span><span><span><span>—</span></span></span><span><span><span>to addressing the perennial questions for each of us. The sessions and speakers promise to prompt conversation that allow you and your school to “dig in”,and challenges each of us to reimagine our work—to take hold of new ideas and at the same time maintain our core principles so that we can bring the best we have to our students every day.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Great Hearts will be there, ready for conversation. We hope to see you there. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><em><span><span><span><span><span>Jerilyn Olson is the<strong> </strong></span></span></span><span><span><span>vice president of professional development at Great Hearts Academies.</span></span></span></span></span></em></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/national-charter-schools-week" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Week</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/national-charter-schools-conference" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Conference</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <h2>Comments</h2> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-159" class="comment js-comment"> <div> <h3> <a href="/comment/159#comment-159" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Jerilyn Olson and the NCSC aritcle</a> </h3> <div class="metabar"> <div class="metabar__item">May 18, 2019 - 06:18pm</div> <div class="metabar__item"><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kelley R.J. Tetzlaff</span></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Excellent piece of writing and thought provoking content.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=159&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="kbT_Wfu8JahzYKkTj8mSnyjA8DvCMOoxNIiNgIdO4IA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-161" class="comment js-comment"> <div> <h3> <a href="/comment/161#comment-161" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">NCSC Article</a> </h3> <div class="metabar"> <div class="metabar__item">May 21, 2019 - 04:28pm</div> <div class="metabar__item"><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kiann R Mapes</span></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Excellent thoughts offered around the inherent value of conversation between colleagues about their work, and the things that matter most therein. I&#039;m also struck by the unique opportunity which well-executed conferences and other academic gatherings provide for colleagues of different organizations to speak to one another. We learn much by identifying and articulating both the alignment and the distinctions of our methods and approaches, as we work together towards such a critically important aim.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=161&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="d31PgJjCRC48GF1IMk0xZT99CqQYEfpfTpBA4yUzgyU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </article> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=14311&amp;2=field_comments&amp;3=comment" token="iAysvB6CqLcx_uqBIpfxZnVshey2O3NdEZtDtJcpyhY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 14 May 2019 21:11:37 +0000 Melinda 14311 at https://www.publiccharters.org Charter Schools and Elected Officials Putting Kids First https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/05/16/charter-schools-and-elected-officials-putting-kids-first <span>Charter Schools and Elected Officials Putting Kids First</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/melinda" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Melinda</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/14/2019 - 16:51</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-author-bio field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/about-us/staff/kim-mccabe" hreflang="en">Kim McCabe</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2019-05-16T12:00:00Z">May 16, 2019</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2019-05/2019%20Champion%20for%20Charters%20Rep.%20Joe%20Wilson%20with%20award.png?itok=z0c2Ae9S" width="250" height="250" alt="Nina Rees, president &amp; CEO of the National Alliance, with 2019 Champion for Charters Rep. Joe Wilson holding his award" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><em>Charter schools have always enjoyed bipartisan support from elected officials from all levels of government. During National Charter Schools Week, we celebrate the champions of the charter school movement. </em></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>If you’ve been following along with us this week you already know that <span><span><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/05/13/4-ways-charter-schools-are-public-schools-and-always-have-been">charter schools are public schools</a></span></span>, serving communities, and <span><span><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/05/10/charter-schools-are-getting-results">getting results</a></span></span> for students. You may have also caught on to something else—the charter school movement is something that everyone can get behind. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Charter schools have enjoyed widespread bipartisan support from day one. Here at the National Alliance, we work with elected officials all over the country and we find Champions for Charters at all levels of government on the right and the left. Which makes sense because elected officials are just that—elected—and represent their constituents. And we know that voters on <span><span><a href="https://www.federationforchildren.org/national-school-choice-poll-shows-67-of-voters-support-school-choice-2019/">the right</a></span></span> and <span><span><a href="https://dfer.org/press/dfer-releases-results-from-public-opinion-research-on-charter-schools/">the left</a></span></span> support charter schools. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>So, this week as we celebrate the incredible accomplishments of charter school leaders, teachers, and students, we are thrilled to have <span><span><a href="https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/proclamation-national-charter-schools-week-2019/">the White House</a></span></span> and <span><span><a href="https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/senate-resolution/202/text?q=%7B%22search%22%3A%5B%22S.Res.+202%22%5D%7D&amp;r=1&amp;s=1">the U.S. Senate</a></span></span> join us. The White House has issued a proclamation recognizing National Charter Schools Week going back nearly 20 years. President Bill Clinton encouraged the growth of charter schools, setting the precedent for every president to follow. Similarly, the U.S. Senate has recognized National Charter Schools Week for the past 20 years through Republican-led and Democrat-led terms. This year’s resolution was no different as the resolution was led by Senators Lamar Alexander and Michael Bennet and secured the support of Dianne Feinstein, Marco Rubio, Mitch McConnell, and Cory Booker (and many more) all coming together in agreement that charter schools are worth celebrating. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>But the celebration this week isn’t just about charter schools—it’s about the people that embody the movement. And the National Alliance recognizes elected officials who support high-quality public school options and the families who want to choose the best public school for their child. This year, we’re recognizing 19 <a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/about-charter-schools/charter-school-trailblazers/champions-charters">Champions for Charters</a>, including three members of Congress who I am particularly excited to celebrate.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong>Ranking Member Virginia Foxx, North Carolina’s 5th Congressional District – Lifetime Achievement Award </strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>I had the honor of meeting Ranking Member Foxx for the first time when she joined the National Alliance for our School Leaders of Color convening earlier this year, but her support for charter schools began long ago. As the ranking member of the House Education and Labor Committee, Congresswoman Foxx is clearly dedicated to supporting student’s in their educational endeavors and, given her background, it’s no surprise. She was the first member of her family to graduate from high school and went on to earn her bachelor’s degree and a MA in college teaching and a doctoral degree in education. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong>Representative Salud Carbajal, California’s 24th Congressional District – Rising Star Award</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Congressman Carbajal’s background looks similar to many of the students who attend charter schools—his family immigrated to the United States from Mexico when he was five and he grew up in an economically disadvantaged neighborhood. Congressman Carbajal was elected to his seat in Congress in 2016, after campaigning as public servant who would work across party lines and is now a member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. As a new member, he has already taken steps to support the federal Charter Schools Program since taking office and I look forward to his continued leadership on behalf of public school students.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong>Representative Joseph Morelle, New York’s 25th Congressional District – Rising Star Award </strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Congressman Morelle represents the district where I was born and raised—in the suburbs of Rochester, NY. I never heard about charter schools when I was growing up, but the charter school movement in the Rochester area has really grown over the last 10 years and there are about 6,000 students attending 19 charter schools in the region. That said, there are still thousands of students on charter school wait lists—and those are the students who will benefit the most from Congressman Morelle’s leadership. While still in his first term, Congressman Morelle has already taken steps to support the federal Charter Schools Program and I hope to see his support for the program continue until all of those students are off wait lists and into high-quality public schools of their choice. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><em>Kim McCabe is the director of digital strategy at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. </em></span></span></span></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/champions-charters" hreflang="en">Champions for Charters</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/national-charter-schools-week" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Week</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=14309&amp;2=field_comments&amp;3=comment" token="O81us1wW4SpDJF-Dfv-GoO_QIF89-r2oiKm8eTGZzyA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 14 May 2019 20:51:46 +0000 Melinda 14309 at https://www.publiccharters.org Putting Students First: Simple, but Not Easy https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/05/16/putting-students-first-simple-not-easy <span>Putting Students First: Simple, but Not Easy</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/melinda" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Melinda</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/14/2019 - 16:42</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-author-bio field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/node/14306" hreflang="en">Kate Freudenheim</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2019-05-16T12:00:00Z">May 16, 2019</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2019-05/Kate%20Freudenheim%20M.Ed_.%20Tulsa%20Honor%20Academy%202.png?itok=rKiBrhmC" width="250" height="250" alt="Student at Tulsa Honor Academy" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span>Every morning at 7:20 AM, my staff circles up to meet. Dedicated to our development, we ground ourselves in a weekly focus area, check-in for quick peer collaboration, and then share daily announcements. However, before we jump in, we ALWAYS start with Scholar Shout Outs. We start every day literally celebrating our individual students’ successes. It’s a simple ritual, but foundational to our culture because in EVERY decision, just like literally every morning, at Tulsa Honor Academy, we put students first. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>I think most schools and districts like to think they put students first. It has a nice ring to it, doesn’t it? Putting students first. It conjures up images of joyful children, perfect classrooms, ample resources, passionate teachers and a cornucopia of much needed social services. An education Shangri-La. This is what our kids need and deserve especially when those students are minority students and/or come from low-income communities. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Putting students first is simple. Put. Students. First. </span></span></p> <p><span><span><img alt="Students at Tulsa Honor Academy" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="69fc2a8a-628f-453b-ade8-ff569852ed5d" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Kate%20Freudenheim%20M.Ed_.%20Tulsa%20Honor%20Academy%203.png" /></span></span></p> <p><span><span>When educators complain about their frustrating experiences, they often site societal declines in student behavior, resources, parent involvement, and instructional support as evidence of a system that doesn’t serve kids well. Valid. However, from my experience in hiring, I’ve found that the exceptional educators are the ones who are truly putting scholars first, and in reality, this is a greater sacrifice than most people understand or are willing to make.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>The best way to explain this is to compare it to the diet and weight loss industry. It’s a multibillion-dollar industry dedicated to literally and figuratively providing people a magic pill that will solve all of their problems. In many cases, the solution is simple: eat healthy and move more. Simple, but not easy. Education is no different. Weight loss for many people means confronting damaging mindsets, correcting unhealthy habits, and more often than not, SACRIFICE. Again, education is no different. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>“Nothing will work, unless you do.” –John Wooden </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Putting scholars first means you sacrifice a lot. It means, as a leader, you have to be willing to make those unpopular decisions that often impact adults (and make everyone’s job a little harder). For every single decision, we ask ourselves, “Is this what is best for our scholars?” “How will it impact their learning?” and “How will it impact our student culture?” </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Many times, the answer means you’re not going to get to take the easy way out. It means it’s probably going to be hard—and you might not get to do that fun thing you wanted to. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>It means your teachers and staff will work long hours and likely miss out on personal or family time. It means that you’re going to have to be tough about what gets put in front of scholars. It means you’re going to have a lot of tough conversations. You’ll probably need access to a tissue box at all times. Real talk. It means you’ll have to reflect and reflect and reflect and be better for your students. </span></span></p> <p><span><span><img alt="Three students at Tulsa Honor Academy" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="05949f63-9517-4b2d-8006-691f2ad1facf" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Kate%20Freudenheim%20M.Ed_.%20Tulsa%20Honor%20Academy%201.png" /></span></span></p> <p><span><span>Tulsa Honor Academy puts scholars first. Always. We hire people who are ready for the difficulty and discomfort inevitable when putting our scholars first. Without hesitation our teachers do whatever it takes to help our scholars even if that means everyone’s job is harder as a consequence.  </span></span></p> <p><span><span>The hierarchy is simple.  </span></span></p> <ol> <li><span><span>Kids’ needs </span></span></li> <li><span><span>Teachers’ needs  </span></span></li> <li><span><span>Families’ needs </span></span></li> <li><span><span>Everything else</span></span></li> </ol> <p><span><span>Simple, but not easy. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Principals, make decisions in that order and hire staff members that work hard and are on board with this hierarchy. You’ll be able to figure out the rest.</span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><em><span><span>Kate Freudenheim, middle school principal at Tulsa Honor Academy</span></span></em></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/national-charter-schools-week" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Week</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <h2>Comments</h2> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-157" class="comment js-comment"> <div> <h3> <a href="/comment/157#comment-157" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Great Article</a> </h3> <div class="metabar"> <div class="metabar__item">May 16, 2019 - 12:27pm</div> <div class="metabar__item"><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Derek Edwards</span></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>You and Mark will be missed so much. Good luck in your future career. Whatever students you end up guiding are very lucky and so was Sadie. She&#039;s going to miss both of you terribly.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=157&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Ac4yUScxu3gZ1nzRwzciIzWHfq6JsCQkIFbnYs9Y-2I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </article> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=14307&amp;2=field_comments&amp;3=comment" token="2g_703MZBvdcVl7-TshcVGeYlfnzzshEThhDJN2F6fM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 14 May 2019 20:42:20 +0000 Melinda 14307 at https://www.publiccharters.org College Counseling that Matters and Gets Results https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/05/15/college-counseling-matters-and-gets-results <span>College Counseling that Matters and Gets Results</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/melinda" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Melinda</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/14/2019 - 16:33</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-author-bio field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/node/14304" hreflang="en">Rich Buery</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2019-05-15T12:00:00Z">May 15, 2019</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2019-05/Rich%20Buery%20KIPP.png?itok=0KtCzQyo" width="250" height="250" alt="Headshot of Rich Buery, Chief of Policy and Public Affairs at the KIPP Foundation " typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span>Twenty-five years ago, KIPP was built on a promise: helping 47 fifth-graders from low-income families climb the mountain to and through college. But reaching this challenging goal proved to be more difficult than we originally thought.</span></p> <p><span>We started with middle schools and realized they weren’t enough—so we expanded down to add elementary schools and then up to add high schools.</span></p> <p><span><span><span>Then, eight years ago, we publicly published the college completion rates for the first two KIPP middle schools and saw that, although our graduates were significantly outperforming their socioeconomic peers in terms of college completion, the majority were still not graduating.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span>With over 27,000 alums, we have learned a lot about what we need to improve. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>We have spent the last eight years expanding or deepening our work on college counseling and college persistence to move those numbers forward.</span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>KIPP provides students with best-in-class college counseling, designed specifically to support those who are first-generation, students of color and students from low-income families.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>We know that college counselors are critical to student success, but today’s counselors have caseloads that are simply unfathomable. Nationwide, the average student to counselor ratio is 482:1.  It is often higher in urban public high schools.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span>Today, KIPP’s high school counselor-student ratio averages 100 to 1. This is a significant resource commitment and we have seen it pay off.</span></p> <p><span>If we want our students to graduate from college, one of the critical things we can do is help them choose the college that is right for them, based on the students’ interests and credentials, the school’s costs, culture, and graduate rates, and a host of other factors.</span></p> <p><span>Part of this is a focus on preventing “undermatching”—the phenomenon where lower-income students are more likely to end up at a less-competitive college than they would otherwise be qualified to attend. Research shows that students who are under-matched are less likely to graduate on time.</span></p> <p><span>Knowing how damaging under-matching can be, in 2014 KIPP developed the College Match program. Since then, the percentage of KIPP high school students applying to a strong mix of schools based on their academic credentials increased from 15 percent to 74 percent—meaning that more of students are likely to graduate.</span></p> <p><span><span>And once students start college our persistence advisors provide academic, emotional and financial support to alumni through their college years.</span></span></p> <p><img alt="Photo of KIPP classroom" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="7074ab04-d5ad-45db-8d8d-1a286d0510b1" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/College%20Counseling%20that%20Matters%20and%20Gets%20Results%20KIPP.png" /></p> <p><span>W<span>e continue to see positive results. KIPP alumni graduate from college at three times the national average for students from similar socioeconomic backgrounds (35 percent vs. 11 percent). And for students who graduate from KIPP high schools, that number jumps to 45 percent.</span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>We’re proud of these results, but they’re not good enough.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>We know we don’t have all the answers and that no one organization can solve this college completion crisis alone.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>But we do believe that our experiences—and more importantly, the experiences of our alumni—give us some insight into what we as a nation can do better, that’s why we came out with a report this month, <span><span><a href="https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.kipp.org%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2019%2F05%2FHigher_Ed_Report_2019.pdf&amp;data=02%7C01%7CMHeraux%40kipp.org%7C3d67e0dec00449c00efe08d6d3a47e55%7C65046ec5da1c4fcb8f6460a5614cb771%7C0%7C0%7C636929100831962810&amp;sdata=pGUaoVsWM2WzPJZ7TFiXn%2BNS4lES2TdGfwtDMDgtfhA%3D&amp;reserved=0">The Promise of a Choice-Filled Life,</a></span></span> where we detail five recommendations to help students from low income families, first generation college students, and students of color succeed in college and career.</span></span></span></p> <p><span>In the report, we call on Congress to reauthorize the Higher Education Act—this is our once in a decade chance to provide more students with a fairer shot at a college degree. We ask Congress to reduce student to counselor ratios and implement evidence-based counseling solutions that we know drive better results for our students, like talking about career pathways.</span></p> <p><span><span><span>Our counselors need to talk about career pathways too. We know from experience that it’s important to start talking to students about careers early on—beginning in elementary school and continuing through higher education. And, we have to do a better job advising students who want to pursue training programs in skilled trades, applied sciences, and modern technologies.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>Together, we have the opportunity to give low-income students, students of color, and first-generation students a fair shot at success in college and beyond</span></span><span>. </span></span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><em><span><span><span>Rich Buery is the chief of policy and public affairs at the KIPP Foundation</span></span></span></em></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/national-charter-schools-week" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Week</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=14305&amp;2=field_comments&amp;3=comment" token="nF2He5M8zn80NNCrwkQ4ssnuuSbdramuwVq6-VekDHk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 14 May 2019 20:33:24 +0000 Melinda 14305 at https://www.publiccharters.org Charter Schools are Getting Results https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/05/10/charter-schools-are-getting-results <span>Charter Schools are Getting Results</span> <h4 class="field field--name-field-subtitle field--type-string-long field--label-hidden field--item">The charter school sector has much to celebrate.</h4> <span><span lang="" about="/user/melinda" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Melinda</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/14/2019 - 16:28</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2019-05-15T12:00:00Z">May 15, 2019</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2019-05/Charter%20Schools%20are%20Getting%20Results%20blog%20post%20featured%20image.png?itok=d4Cw62Bp" width="250" height="250" alt="Charter Schools are Getting Results blog post featured image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span>In an education system that has been equally quick to end reforms as it is to introduce them, for over 25 years the charter sector has seen significant growth. This is due in no small part to the fact that parents want charter schools as an option for their children because charter schools, on average, generate positive results for their students. </span></p> <p><span><strong>Test Outcomes</strong></span></p> <p><span>Measured by improvement on test outcomes, study after study across methods and samples, has shown that the average student in a public charter school experiences equal or higher achievement growth in English and/or math than that of a district school peer (<a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/05/14/charter-schools-are-different-and-so-research">more on research methodology</a>) This is true for “gold-standard” randomized-assignment designs (<span><span><a href="https://economics.mit.edu/files/13447">here</a></span></span>, <span><span><a href="http://seii.mit.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Explaining-Charter-School-Effectiveness.pdf">here</a></span></span>, <span><span><a href="https://scholar.harvard.edu/files/fryer/files/dobbie_fryer_revision_final.pdf">here</a></span></span>, <span><span><a href="https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED528381.pdf">here</a></span></span>, <span><span><a href="https://www.nber.org/papers/w14852.pdf">here</a></span></span>, <span><span><a href="https://www.povertyactionlab.org/sites/default/files/publications/924%20Urban%20Boarding%20Schools%20for%20the%20Poor%20Jan2014.pdf">here</a></span></span>, <span><span><a href="http://www2.econ.iastate.edu/classes/econ321/Orazem/Fryer_high_quality_schools.pdf">here</a></span></span>, <span><span><a href="http://www.kipp.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/kipp_scale-up_vol1-1.pdf">here</a></span></span>, etc.) and for quasi-experimental designs (<span><span><a href="https://educationresearchalliancenola.org/files/publications/Harris-Larsen-Effects-of-New-Orleans-Post-Katrina-Market-Based-School-Reforms.pdf">here</a></span></span>, <span><span><a href="https://cityschools.stanford.edu/sites/g/files/sbiybj10771/f/indianapolis_slide_deck_final.pdf">here</a></span></span>, <span><span><a href="http://urbancharters.stanford.edu/download/Urban%20Charter%20School%20Study%20Report%20on%2041%20Regions.pdf">here</a></span></span>, <span><span><a href="https://www.nwea.org/content/uploads/2013/08/An-Application-of-Propensity-Score-Stratification-Using-Multilevel-Models.pdf">here</a></span></span>, etc.). Research has also demonstrated that charter schools perform well with traditionally underserved student populations. For example, a recent study found that Black students in charter schools gained an additional 89 days of learning in math.     </span></p> <p><span>To be clear, these are average effects on test-scores. There is certainly variance among charter schools in their ability to affect student outcomes with some schools performing below expectations. However, part of the charter school sector model is addressing these failures and closing schools that fail to perform. Indeed, there is research (<span><span><a href="https://educationresearchalliancenola.org/files/publications/Bross-Harris-Liu-The-Effects-of-Performance-Based-School-Closure-and-Charter-Takeover-on-Student-Performance.pdf">here</a></span></span> and <span><span><a href="https://credo.stanford.edu/closure-virtual-control-records">here</a></span></span>) suggesting that some of the positive effects we see from the charter sector are due to school closures. This research suggests the importance of looking at the charter sector over time, so the mechanisms of accountability can have time to influence the composition of the charter school sector. Perhaps even more important is research on policy implementation that suggests the importance of giving enough time for policies to develop and improve as implementation is better understood. This is evident in studies of <span><span><a href="https://www.nber.org/papers/w20645.pdf">Texas</a></span></span> and <span><span><a href="https://www.nber.org/papers/w21078.pdf">North Carolina</a></span></span>. These studies find that, over time, the charter sector improved to a point that students enrolled in charter schools, on average, outperformed their traditional school counterparts. The authors caution that this effect could be due to student sorting patterns. However, thoughtful <span><span><a href="https://www.brookings.edu/research/the-evolution-of-the-charter-school-market-and-the-next-generation-of-charter-school-research/">treatment</a></span></span> of these assumptions suggest that it is unlikely that student sorting accounts for the entirety of the effects and encourages further work on the matter.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Attainment Outcomes</strong></span></p> <p><span>The use of test scores to measure performance is a factor of both convenience and an assumption that test scores are related to attainment. Indeed, some of the best <span><span><a href="http://www.rajchetty.com/chettyfiles/w19424.pdf">research</a></span></span> available has demonstrated a strong relationship between test scores and longer-term outcomes such as graduation and early-career earnings.  However, there is also <span><span><a href="http://www.aei.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Do-Impacts-on-Test-Scores-Even-Matter.pdf">evidence</a></span></span> of schools influencing attainment outcomes without influencing test scores and vice versa. Because we are ultimately interested in longer-term outcomes for our students, the research base evaluating these outcomes has grown over the past decade. </span></p> <p><span>This is largely because as the charter school movement ages, we can track students through high school, college, and career, but also due to better data systems allowing researchers to follow students through these transitions. Research has shown that students attending charter schools are <span><span><a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/658089?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents">more likely to graduate</a></span></span> from high school (7-11% higher), <span><span><a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/658089?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents">attend</a></span></span> and <span><span><a href="https://cesr.usc.edu/documents/charter_high_school_effects_on_attainment_and_earnings.pdf">persist</a></span></span> in college (10-11% and 6-13% higher, respectively), and have <span><span><a href="https://cesr.usc.edu/documents/charter_high_school_effects_on_attainment_and_earnings.pdf">higher future earnings</a></span></span> (over 12% higher). Studies have also found that female students are less <span><span><a href="https://www.nber.org/papers/w19581.pdf">likely to become pregnant</a></span></span> in their teens, male students are <span><span><a href="https://www.nber.org/papers/w19581.pdf">less likely to be incarcerated</a></span></span>, and students are <span><span><a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.3102/0162373715597298">less likely to be absent</a></span></span>.</span></p> <p><span>It is certainly worth noting that these outcomes are driven by charter schools that, on average, receive 20-40% less funding than their traditional school counterparts. These figures are even more striking when one considers that <span><span><a href="https://www.kappanonline.org/state-teacher-pension-subsidies-equity-shuls-hitt-costrell/">18 states</a></span></span> pay for the pension system before allocating funds to schools, charter schools typically must pay for facilities expenses through their operating budget, and many states have <span><span><a href="https://williampennfoundation.org/sites/default/files/reports/Hold%20Harmless.pdf">hold harmless</a></span></span> policies that subsidize districts for students that move to a charter school. A recent <span><span><a href="http://www.uaedreform.org/wp-content/uploads/a-good-investment-public-charter-schools-in-8-us-cities.pdf">study</a></span></span> of the charter sectors in eight cities confirms the funding inequity and found that charter schools are more cost-effective and provide a larger return-on-investment than their traditional school counterparts. Though caution should be used about making linear assumption between increasing funding and student outcomes, the findings still suggest that even at lower funding levels, charter schools are delivering on their commitment to better serving their students.</span></p> <p><span>Taken together, it is easy to say that, on average, charter schools are doing what they set out to do—improving educational opportunities for students. This is evidenced by the myriad of studies finding positive effects on outcomes from test-scores to future-earnings, all while operating with fewer resources. If that wasn’t enough, we estimate that there are approximately 5 million students who would attend a charter school if one was available.</span></p> <p> </p> <p><em><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/about-us/staff/nathan-barrett-phd"><strong>Nathan Barrett, Ph.D.</strong></a>, is the </em><em>Senior Director, Research and Evaluation at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.</em></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/national-charter-schools-week" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Week</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/research" hreflang="en">research</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=14303&amp;2=field_comments&amp;3=comment" token="rpuSR-1gba3gSLpbF_OFQtOgW1Juptfxo9eYsE3KI3o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 14 May 2019 20:28:49 +0000 Melinda 14303 at https://www.publiccharters.org Charter Schools ARE Different—And so is the Research https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/05/14/charter-schools-are-different-and-so-research <span>Charter Schools ARE Different—And so is the Research</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/melinda" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Melinda</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/14/2019 - 13:22</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2019-05-14T12:00:00Z">May 14, 2019</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-image-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="media media-image view-mode-display"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2019-05/Research%20Methods%20graphic.png?itok=gKDBWZmw" width="250" height="250" alt="Research Methods graphic" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span>Research designs for studies looking into charter school student outcomes look a little different than studies that look squarely at district school students or all public school students. That’s because charter schools <em>are</em> different. </span></p> <p><span>Charter schools are schools of choice and that means that every student who enters a charter schools’ doors has self-selected to be there. The key to identifying the effect of that decision is finding a student who wanted to be there but is not. How researchers identify that student is an important and often contested process. But, while there is certainly a healthy debate around preferred research designs, samples, and outcomes, the positive effects of charter schools on their students are robust.    </span></p> <p><span>There are two widely used methods: “gold-standard” randomized-assignment designs and quasi-experimental designs. The key difference between these two approaches is how they account for the influence of selection bias on estimated results. </span></p> <p><span>Randomized-assignment studies leverage lotteries to match those students selected into a charter program to those students that were not. Unobserved factors that influenced an application, like parental engagement are controlled for by the lottery and researchers can also ensure they are comparing similarly situated students across those groups. The difficulty is what these studies can say about the charter sector more generally since there may be something different about charter schools that have a waitlist or the area in which they are located. However, a recent <span><span><a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15582159.2017.1286210?journalCode=wjsc20">meta-analysis</a></span></span> gives us confidence that the results found in these studies can speak more broadly about the charter sector generally. </span></p> <p><span>Quasi-experimental studies do not leverage lotteries but instead try and match a student attending a charter school to an otherwise similar student who did not. While this allows researchers to evaluate effects across a wider range of charter schools, they must assume that matching on observable characteristics can account for the possible effect of the unobserved family and student factors that may have influenced the decision to attend a charter school. While this assumption is somewhat tenuous, recent research (<span><span><a href="https://sites.hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/PEPG15_04.pdf">here</a></span></span> and <span><span><a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0895904817741543">here</a></span></span>) has emerged that give these studies further credibility. Furthermore, there are other considerations such as cost, coverage, and timing that make these studies useful. </span></p> <p><span>At the end of the day, some studies are better executed than others. And although studies differ in design, sample, and outcome, we continue to hold charter schools accountable for student performance and we continue to see positive results for students in charter schools. This week, for National Charter Schools Week, I’m going to dive into the latest research on charter schools utilizing both of these research methods.</span></p> <p> </p> <p><span><em>Nathan Barrett, Ph.D., is the </em></span><em>Senior Director, Research and Evaluation at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.</em></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/national-charter-schools-week" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Week</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/research" hreflang="en">research</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=14301&amp;2=field_comments&amp;3=comment" token="VaB3ELOpyi7V3D-Zwh_0AKqglRIPb2FBKrkBcvSJ0wg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 14 May 2019 17:22:23 +0000 Melinda 14301 at https://www.publiccharters.org