Press Release https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/category/press-release en National Alliance Honors U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander with the Charter Schools Lifetime Achievement Award https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/05/13/national-alliance-honors-us-senator-lamar-alexander-charter-schools-lifetime <span>National Alliance Honors U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander with the Charter Schools Lifetime Achievement Award</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/reed" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reed</span></span> <span>Fri, 05/08/2020 - 16:26</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/press-release" hreflang="en">Press Release</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-05-13T12:00:00Z">May 13, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Washington, D.C.</strong> – Today the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools (National Alliance) announced it will give the prestigious Charter Schools Lifetime Achievement Award to U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN), as part of continued celebrations during National Charter Schools Week. Since the award’s inception there have only been two other recipients, Dr. Wyatt Tee Walker, former chief of staff to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (2016) and former President Bill Clinton (2011). </p> <p>Senator Alexander was first recognized by the National Alliance as a “Champion for Charters” in 2007. As Chair of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) committee and a member of the Senate appropriations committee, Senator Alexander understands the value of charter schools and works hard to ensure more students have access to a high-quality public-school option. Senator Alexander’s leadership inspired his staff and other colleagues to lead legislative initiatives and resolutions that strengthened the charter school sector. Senator Alexander has champion charter schools since they were created and his clarity around providing high quality education options today makes him an invaluable leader in education equity.</p> <p>“There are thousands of passionate advocates, administrators and teachers in our movement, but the work of Senator Alexander to provide all students with access to a high-quality public school is second to none,” said Nina Rees, president and CEO of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. “Senator Alexander is leaving an impressive legacy: No child’s destiny should be determined by their zip code. After decades of being a steadfast champion of charter schools, it is an honor to present our highest award, the Charter Schools Lifetime Achievement Award, to Senator Alexander.”</p> <p>"I was around for the start of charter schools,” U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander said<strong>.</strong> “I remember the Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party in Minnesota created the first dozen or so start-from-scratch schools, and then President George H.W. Bush—through his U.S. Department of Education—encouraged those new American schools, start-from-scratch schools. Then, as he left office, and I left office as U.S. Secretary of Education, I wrote every school district and asked them to create one of those new start-from-scratch, public charter schools. And, look where we've come today — seven percent of all public schools in America are charter schools. That means more freedom for teachers. That means more choices for parents and for children. The thing I like best about it is that over the years it's been a bipartisan effort. So, it's been a great thirty years for the teachers, for the parents and for the students. Let's make it another great thirty years and see where we can take this country.”</p> <p>"Senator Alexander has a long history of advocacy on behalf of charter schools," said Maya Bugg, CEO of the Tennessee Charter School Center. "Senator Alexander’s support has been crucial for the growth of high-quality charter schools across Tennessee and the more than 38,000 students they serve. We thank him for his championing of charter schools over the years."    </p> <p>The Charter Schools Lifetime Achievement Award is granted to extraordinary individuals who devote tireless passion in support of charter schools and dedicate their lives to accomplishing significant results for the charter school movement. This honor is awarded to contributors who have had a lasting and fundamental impact on, not only charter schools, but the education system as a whole. The awardee is someone who has demonstrated an unparalleled commitment to the cause, and whose numerous achievements have been acknowledged by charter school advocates, their professional peers, and the general public.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/170" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Week</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/96" hreflang="en">Nina Rees</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/157" hreflang="en">Lifetime Achievement Award</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/194" hreflang="en">Champions for Charters</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 08 May 2020 20:26:31 +0000 Reed 17646 at https://www.publiccharters.org Ten Charter Schools Honored with Above and Beyond Awards for Outstanding Service During COVID-19 Pandemic https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/05/12/ten-charter-schools-honored-above-and-beyond-awards-outstanding-service <span>Ten Charter Schools Honored with Above and Beyond Awards for Outstanding Service During COVID-19 Pandemic</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/reed" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reed</span></span> <span>Fri, 05/08/2020 - 15:25</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/press-release" hreflang="en">Press Release</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-05-12T12:00:00Z">May 12, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Washington, D.C.</strong> – Today, the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools (National Alliance) is honoring 10 charter schools from across America with inaugural Above and Beyond Awards as part of celebrations for National Charter Schools Week (May 10-16). While all charter schools showed exemplary commitment to their students by rapidly transitioning to distance learning this spring, and most offered additional supports like meals and hardware, these schools went to remarkable lengths to meet the needs of not only their students, but the families of their students, and their larger communities in the face of the pandemic. We are proud of the innovative and altruistic ways charter schools are showing up for students and communities—and these efforts have inspired this year’s National Charter Schools Week theme, “Above and Beyond.”</p> <p>“When charter schools nationwide transitioned to distance learning, it became clear to us that charter schools were setting a model for the rest of the nation on what it looked like to step up and care for their communities in the face of a global pandemic,” said Nina Rees, president and CEO of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. “There are many public schools that served their students well in the face of COVID-19, but the exceptional work of our Above and Beyond Award winners embodies compassion and caring for people outside their school community who also needed help. Their work is a model of servant leadership for the rest of the nation.”</p> <p><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/about-charter-schools/charter-school-trailblazers/2020-above-and-beyond-awards"><strong>Above and Beyond Award Honorees</strong></a></p> <ul><li>Baxter Academy for Technology and Science, Portland, ME</li> <li>Common Ground High School, New Haven, CT</li> <li>Discovery Charter School, Rochester, NY</li> <li>DSST Public Schools, Denver, CO</li> <li>Harmony Public Charter Schools, Houston, TX</li> <li>Impact Public Schools, Seattle, WA</li> <li>KIPP Columbus, Columbus, OH</li> <li>Palms West Charter School, Loxahatchee, FL</li> <li>Raul Yzaguirre Schools for Success, Houston, TX</li> <li>Spring Charter Schools, Riverside County, CA</li> </ul><p>The National Charter Schools Week 2020 theme, “Above and Beyond,” speaks to the extraordinary work all charter schools are doing during the pandemic. To join us in celebrating this week, share photos and videos of charter school parents, students and supporters with the schools and the National Alliance on social media. On Twitter tag the school and @charteralliance, and hashtag #CharterSchoolsWeek and #AboveandBeyond.</p> <p>For questions regarding today’s announcement, please reach out to <a href="mailto:shaelyn@publiccharters.org">shaelyn@publiccharters.org</a>. For information on National Charter Schools Week please <a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/what-you-can-do/celebrate-national-charter-schools-week">visit us online</a>.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/170" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Week</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/96" hreflang="en">Nina Rees</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 08 May 2020 19:25:35 +0000 Reed 17645 at https://www.publiccharters.org National Charter Schools Week Celebrates Charter Schools Going Above and Beyond to Meet the Needs of Nearly 3.3 Million Students During the Pandemic https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/05/11/national-charter-schools-week-celebrates-charter-schools-going-above-and <span>National Charter Schools Week Celebrates Charter Schools Going Above and Beyond to Meet the Needs of Nearly 3.3 Million Students During the Pandemic</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/reed" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reed</span></span> <span>Fri, 05/08/2020 - 15:22</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/press-release" hreflang="en">Press Release</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-05-11T12:00:00Z">May 11, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Washington, D.C</strong>. – Today, the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools (National Alliance) kicks off National Charter Schools Week (NSCW) (May 10-16) celebrating the nearly 7,500 public charter schools and campuses across the nation. NCSW exists to celebrate charter schools, the high-quality, tuition-free public-schools that nearly 3.3 million students across America depend on for an excellent education. During NCSW celebrations we will highlight schools, students, education leaders, policymakers, and advocates that have demonstrated the strength and resilience of the charter school movement as the nation was forced to rapidly transition to a new normal, in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Public schools have been placed at the center of support and relief efforts and charter schools showed their best selves. By enabling distance learning, providing technology to students, and providing meals and countless other services to the community, charter schools did whatever was needed.</p> <p>“In the face of this pandemic, the inequities facing America’s most underserved students have never been clearer,” said Nina Rees, president and CEO of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. “Issues like the homework gap, the digital divide, food insecurity and under-resourced schools are even more prominent now. Charter schools have prioritized not only meeting the academic needs of their students, but the holistic needs of their students’ families and their communities. We applaud their efforts to go above and beyond and stand in solidarity with the estimated five million students who would attend a charter school if one were available to them. As the pandemic continues to spotlight the inequities within our public education system, we hope National Charter Schools Week is a reminder to policymakers that charter schools are a beacon of light for millions of our nation’s students and families.”</p> <p>This year’s theme, “Above and Beyond”, honors charter schools who have done extraordinary work to serve their students, the families of their students and others in the community during the pandemic.</p> <p><strong>Monday, May 11: Join Us in National Charter Schools Week Celebrations</strong><br /> Celebrate the great work charter schools are doing in their communities with us online! Check out the NSCW proclamation from the <a href="https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/proclamation-national-charter-schools-week-2020/?utm_campaign=Charter%20Schools%20Week%202020&amp;utm_source=hs_email&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8O1z3a9j760ujakAkyCNImOi6MhEcMODPfRRuOBnFvLUcpjmZNKM9xbUhAsflVJOrQST1A">White House</a> and join the conversation on social media using the hashtags #CharterSchoolsWeek and #CharterLove to share how charter schools are going above and beyond to serve the needs of students and the larger community. Charter schools are encouraged to use the <a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/what-you-can-do/celebrate-national-charter-schools-week">NCSW 2020 toolkit</a> with turnkey tools that make it easy for charter schools, charter management organizations, and partners to recognize and amplify the great work of charter schools.</p> <p><strong>Tuesday, May 12: Above and Beyond Awards </strong><br /> The National Alliance is recognizing 10 schools as recipients of our first-ever Above and Beyond Awards. The awards will be given to outstanding charter schools that performed exceptional work for their students and their communities during the COVID-19 pandemic.</p> <p><strong>Wednesday, May 13: Charter Schools Lifetime Achievement Award</strong><br /> Join the National Alliance in celebrating one U.S. Senator who will be recognized for a lifetime of efforts to provide a high-quality public school to every child. Stay tuned to learn who the National Alliance’s 2020 Charter Schools Lifetime Achievement Award winner is. Since the award’s inception there have only been two other recipients, Dr. Wyatt Tee Walker, former chief of staff to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (2016) and former President Bill Clinton (2011). </p> <p><strong>Thursday, May 14: Webinar: A Community-wide Coordinated Response in the Time of Crisis</strong><br /> You are invited to a <a href="https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_VFOPgLicQp-uuuqJqEDz-Q?utm_campaign=Charter%20Schools%20Week%202020&amp;utm_source=hs_email&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8O1z3a9j760ujakAkyCNImOi6MhEcMODPfRRuOBnFvLUcpjmZNKM9xbUhAsflVJOrQST1A">webinar</a> hosted by the National Alliance, that will recognize this year’s Above and Beyond Award honorees and include a thoughtful discussion about how public schools can partner with one another and serve their communities in times of crisis. The webinar will include remarks by former U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu and a moderated discussion with education leaders from New Orleans. An open Q&amp;A session will follow.</p> <p><strong>Friday, May 15: “I Love Charter Schools” Spirit Day</strong><br /> NCSW will conclude with an “I Love Charter Schools” spirit day to wrap up our #CharterLove campaign. Be sure to tag @charteralliance on social media with photos and videos of students, teachers, and charter school advocates showing love for these innovative public schools.</p> <p>Now in its 20th year, National Charter Schools Week was first declared by President Clinton. Although the growth of public charter schools began under President Clinton, Presidents Bush, Obama, and Trump have all continued this national, public commendation of charter schools.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/170" hreflang="en">National Charter Schools Week</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/96" hreflang="en">Nina Rees</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 08 May 2020 19:22:58 +0000 Reed 17643 at https://www.publiccharters.org Charter School Leaders of Color from Across the Nation Gather for Convening in Nation's Capital https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/02/24/charter-school-leaders-color-across-nation-gather-convening-nations-capital <span>Charter School Leaders of Color from Across the Nation Gather for Convening in Nation&#039;s Capital</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/reed" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reed</span></span> <span>Fri, 02/21/2020 - 15:12</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/press-release" hreflang="en">Press Release</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-02-24T12:00:00Z">February 24, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>WASHINGTON, D.C. </span></span></span></strong><span><span><span>— Today, the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools kicks off its fifth annual School Leaders of Color (SLOC) convening. This cohort of black, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American charter school leaders who run high-quality public schools are in Washington to share best practices and showcase the secret to their success. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>As our country struggles to diversify its teaching force and boost student achievement for black, brown and low-income students, the work of these school leaders is particularly noteworthy. </span></span></span><span><span><span>Studies have found that K-12 students perform better academically if they’ve been assigned to a teacher of the same race. </span></span></span><span><span><span>These findings are significant given that the teaching force at charter schools is more diverse than at traditional public schools; and </span></span></span><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/sites/default/files/documents/2020-02/Race%20match%20fact%20sheet%2002212020.pdf"><span><span><span>data suggests</span></span></span></a><span><span><span> that students who have been ill-served in district operated schools, especially students of color, flourish at charter schools; </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>In 2017-18, 33 percent of charter school students were Hispanic compared to 27 percent in the district, 26 percent were black compared to 14 percent in the district and 32 percent were white compared to 48 percent in the district.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>In 2015-2016, 11 percent of charter school principals were Hispanic compared to 8 percent in the district, 15 percent were black compared to 10 percent in the district and 70 percent were white compared to 79 percent in the district.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><p><span><span><span><span><span>“</span></span><span><span><span>It’s an honor to host some of our nation’s top school leaders and hear more about how the flexibility and autonomy of the charter school model allows them to directly serve the students of their communities,” </span></span></span><span><span>said National Alliance President and CEO Nina Rees. </span></span><span><span><span>“C</span></span></span><span><span>harter schools employ more teachers of color and enroll more students of color than traditional public schools. It’s critical that we equip school leaders of color with the tools they need to open and run great schools – ultimately yielding more educational equity and stronger student performance.” </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>According to Stanford University’s </span></span></span><a href="https://urbancharters.stanford.edu/download/Urban%20Charter%20School%20Study%20Report%20on%2041%20Regions.pdf"><span><span><span>CREDO</span></span></span></a><span><span><span>, black students in urban charter schools gained 36 additional days of learning in math and 26 additional days of learning in reading per year as compared to their district school peers. And for Hispanic students, charter schools generate learning growth equivalent to 22 extra days in math and 6 extra days in reading annually. For low-income Hispanic students, these numbers rise to 48 extra days in math and 25 extra days in reading. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>This year’s cohort includes the following participants:</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Eric Anderson – </span></span></span></strong><span><span><span>Executive Director, Sussex Academy, Georgetown, DE</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Daniela Anello</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Head of School, DC Bilingual Public Charter School, Washington D.C.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Aaron Bass</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – CEO, Vision Academies, Wilmington, DE</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Andrea Breaux</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Assistant Principal, Harmony Public Schools: HS-Achievement, Houston, TX</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Kelly Brown</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Manager of Data &amp; Assessment, Inspired Teaching Demonstration School, Washington, D.C.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Latoye Brown </span></span></span></strong><span><span><span>– Founder and School Leader, Audubon Charter School, New Orleans, LA</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>LaKendra Butler</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – School Leader and Founder<strong>, </strong>STRIVE Collegiate Academy, Nashville, TN</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Sekani Ciare</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Teacher, One City Schools, Madison, WI</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Keisha Cummings</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Parent Director, Richmond Urban Collective, Richmond, VA</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Sarah Davis</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Middle School Educator and Community Engagement and Family Advocacy Coordinator, Resurgence Hall Charter School, East Point, GA</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Dr. India Ford</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Superintendent, T2 Honors Academy, Warrensville Heights, OH</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Tameka Germany</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Assistant Principal, Harmony Public Schools: HS Exploration, Houston, TX</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Nicole Goodman</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – CEO, Scuola Vita Nuova Charter School, Kansas City, MO</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Antione Green</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Principal, TLAG, Richmond, VA</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Chevonne Hall</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – CEO, Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women, Baltimore, MD</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Shanee Harmon</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Vice President, Richmond Urban Collective, Richmond, VA</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Joe Harris</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Chief Operating Officer, Friendship Aspire Academy Arkansas, Little Rock, AR</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Amanda Johnson</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Executive Director, Clarksdale Collegiate, Clarksdale, MS</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Tish Johnson</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Managing Director, External Relations and Communications, BRICK Academy, Newark, NJ</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Rafiq Kalam Id-Din</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> <strong>II </strong>– Co-Founder and Managing Partner, Ember Charter School for Mindful Education, Innovation and Transformation, New York, NY</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Deshanna King</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Assistant Principal, Harmony Public Schools: HS-Endeavor, Houston, TX</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Jennifer Lopez</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – CEO, Carmen Schools of Science and Technology, Milwaukee, WI</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Tysie McDowell-Ray</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Co-Founder and Chief Academic Officer, Crossroads Charter Schools, Kansas City, MO</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Briana Miles</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Principal, BELIEVE Schools, Indianapolis, IN</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Lagra Newman</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Founder and Head of School, Purpose Prep, Nashville, TN</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Angelique Phillips</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Sr. Director of External Affairs, Excellence Community Schools, New York, NY</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Quentin Phipps</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Director of Advocacy and Policy, Stamford Charter School for Excellence, Excellence Community Schools, Middletown, CT</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Vivek Ramakrishnan</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Co-Founder and Director of Operations and Strategy, One City Schools, Madison, WI</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Kristine Rivera</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Director of Family and Community Engagement, Excellence Community Schools, New York, NY</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>DeArchie Scott</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Founder and Head of School, Ambition Prep, Jackson, MS</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Elaine Swafford </span></span></span></strong><span><span><span>–<strong> </strong>CEO, Chattanooga Girls Leadership Academy, Chattanooga, TN</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>John Taylor</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Executive Director, Booker T. Washington Academy, New Haven, CT</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Quiana Toliver</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Assistant Principal, Harmony Public Schools: </span></span></span><span><span>Harmony Innovation School<span>, Katy, TX</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Marylyn Valencia</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Changemaker Programs / Compliance Director, Changemaker High School, Tucson, AZ</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Lynn Valenzuela</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Principal, Mexicayotl Academy, Tucson, AZ</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Dawn Walton</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Executive Director, Empower Community High School, Aurora, CO</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Kathleen Wang</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Principal, Pioneer Valley Chinese Immersion, Hadley, MA</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Maya Woods-Cadiz</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> – Superintendent, American Indian Model (AIM) Schools, Oakland, CA</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><p><span><span><span><span>For media interested in interviewing a SLOC conference attendee, please reach out to Shaelyn Macedonio at shaelyn@publiccharters.org.</span></span></span></span></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/153" hreflang="en">School Leaders of Color</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 21 Feb 2020 20:12:58 +0000 Reed 17033 at https://www.publiccharters.org As Democratic Candidates Descend on Iowa, New Report Shows Hawkeye State Ranks in Bottom Five in Annual Charter School Law Rankings https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/01/27/democratic-candidates-descend-iowa-new-report-shows-hawkeye-state-ranks <span>As Democratic Candidates Descend on Iowa, New Report Shows Hawkeye State Ranks in Bottom Five in Annual Charter School Law Rankings</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/shaelyn" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">shaelyn</span></span> <span>Mon, 01/27/2020 - 08:11</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/press-release" hreflang="en">Press Release</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-01-27T12:00:00Z">January 27, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><strong><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span>DES MOINES, IA </span></span></strong><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span>— The National Alliance for Public Charter Schools released its annual state-by-state ranking of charter school laws today, </span></span><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/measuring-model-ranking-state-public-charter-school-laws-2020"><em><span><span>Measuring Up to the Model: A Ranking of State Public Charter School Laws, Eleventh Edition</span></span></em></a><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span>. Iowa, which will hold its caucus on February 3rd, lands in the bottom five (41/45) of the nation’s charter school laws for the fifth consecutive year—highlighting <span>the key battleground state’s failure to provide ample school choice for families.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span><span>Iowa enacted its charter school law in 2002 and currently less than 150 public school students attend only two charter schools</span>. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span><span>“Iowa continues to rank at the bottom when it comes to school choice for families in the state,” said Mark Jacobs, Founder and President of Reaching Higher Iowa. “Improving K-12 outcomes begins with providing parents more options and access to higher quality schools for their students. Iowa must explore how the state can better meet the demands of parents.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span>“Closing the education achievement gap should be the number one priority of our leaders no matter their political party,” said Nina Rees, President and CEO of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. “Too many children are falling behind in Iowa and comprehensive education reform must be at the forefront in order to give students the education they deserve.”<br /><br /> The National Alliance’s 2020 rankings measure each state’s charter school law against a “gold standard” model charter school law, </span></span><a href="http://www.publiccharters.org/publications/model-law-supporting-high-quality-charter-public-schools/"><em><span><span><span><span><span>A Model Law for Supporting the Growth of High-Quality Charter Schools: Second Edition</span></span></span></span></span></em></a><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span>, released in October 2016. The National Alliance’s model law helps policymakers and education advocates see the notable strides and drops of charter school laws and raises the key battleground state’s profile in failing to provide school choice for families.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span>The Eleventh Edition of </span></span><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/measuring-model-ranking-state-public-charter-school-laws-2020"><em><span><span><span><span><span>Measuring Up to the Model</span></span></span></span></span></em></a><em> </em><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span>ranks charter school laws in 44 states and the District of Columbia. Each law receives a score based on 21 essential metrics, including accountability, flexibility, and funding equity.<br /><br /> For additional key findings in the report, please view the national <span><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/01/27/new-state-rankings-report-compares-charter-school-laws-state-state">press release</a> </span>from the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.</span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/169" hreflang="en">Charter School Model Law</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/189" hreflang="en">rankings</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 27 Jan 2020 13:11:58 +0000 shaelyn 16658 at https://www.publiccharters.org New State Rankings Report Compares Charter School Laws State by State https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2020/01/27/new-state-rankings-report-compares-charter-school-laws-state-state <span>New State Rankings Report Compares Charter School Laws State by State </span> <h4 class="field field--name-field-subtitle field--type-string-long field--label-hidden field--item">How Charter School Laws are Holding up in a Shifting Political Environment </h4> <span><span lang="" about="/user/reed" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reed</span></span> <span>Fri, 01/24/2020 - 16:46</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/press-release" hreflang="en">Press Release</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2020-01-27T12:00:00Z">January 27, 2020</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>WASHINGTON, D.C. </strong>— Today, the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools released its annual ranking of state charter school laws, <a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/measuring-model-ranking-state-public-charter-school-laws-2020"><em>Measuring Up to the Model: A Ranking of State Public Charter School Laws, Eleventh Edition</em></a> in conjunction with National School Choice Week. For more than a decade, this report has analyzed how well each state aligns its charter school law to the “gold standard” model law, <a href="http://www.publiccharters.org/publications/model-law-supporting-high-quality-charter-public-schools/"><em>A Model Law for Supporting the Growth of High-Quality Charter Schools: Second Edition</em></a>. States are ranked by their composite score, which is based on 21 critical benchmarks like accountability, authorization, flexibility, performance-based contracts, and funding equity.</p> <p>“Charter schools are not a one-size-fits all value proposition and state laws governing their creation have a huge impact on their quality and ability to innovate,” said National Alliance for Public Charter Schools President and CEO Nina Rees. “This report is a tool that blue and red state policymakers and advocates can use to bolster their state’s charter school laws and improve the quality of the sector by requiring best practices and guaranteeing charter school freedoms to innovate.”</p> <p>For the fifth consecutive year, <strong>Indiana</strong> has the nation’s strongest charter school law in the country, ranking No. 1 (out of 45). Indiana’s law does not cap charter school growth, includes multiple authorizers, and provides a fair amount of autonomy and accountability. Indiana has made significant strides in recent years to provide more equitable funding to charter schools, although more work remains to be done.</p> <p>Key findings from the report include:</p> <ul><li><strong>Idaho </strong>and <strong>Tennessee </strong>made the biggest jump in this year’s rankings, both moving up four spots. Idaho went from No. 21 to No. 17 because of policy changes to better support charter school facility needs. Tennessee moved from No. 28 to No. 24 because it created a new statewide appellate body and strengthened authorizer accountability.<br />  </li> <li>The <strong>Top 10</strong> includes a mixture of states with more mature movements (<strong>Indiana</strong> at No. 1, <strong>Colorado</strong> at No. 2, <strong>Minnesota</strong> at No. 4, <strong>Florida</strong> at No. 7, <strong>Louisiana</strong> at No. 8, and <strong>D.C.</strong> at No. 10) and states with newer movements (<strong>Washington</strong> at No. 3, <strong>Alabama</strong> at No. 5, <strong>Mississippi</strong> at No. 6, and <strong>Maine</strong> at No. 9). The makeup of the top 10 shows that many existing states continue to strengthen their laws based on what’s working (and what’s not working) and that many new states rely heavily on those lessons learned so they don’t repeat the mistakes of the states that came before them.<br />  </li> <li><strong>California </strong>and <strong>Illinois</strong> experienced notable drops in this year’s rankings. <strong>California</strong> fell from No. 18 to No. 20 because it weakened the state’s appellate process and eliminated teacher certification flexibility for charter schools. <strong>Illinois</strong> dropped from No. 35 to No. 37 because it also weakened the state’s appellate process.<br />  </li> <li>States that are enacting laws for the first time and states that are overhauling their laws are bypassing states that were previously ranked higher, such as <strong>Massachusetts,</strong> <strong>Arizona,</strong> and <strong>New York</strong>. This means more states have better charter school laws across the country.<br />  </li> <li>In 2019, <strong>West Virginia</strong> became the 45th state to enact a charter school law. While West Virginia’s law provides sufficient autonomy and accountability, it also includes a cap that only provides for limited charter school growth, only allows district authorizers, and does not provide any facilities support. Its inaugural ranking is No. 34.<br />  </li> <li><strong>Maryland</strong> has the nation’s weakest charter school law, ranking No. 45 (out of 45). While Maryland’s law does not cap charter school growth, it only allows district authorizers and provides little autonomy, insufficient accountability, and inequitable funding to charter schools. Rounding out the bottom five states are <strong>Iowa</strong> (No. 41), <strong>Wyoming</strong> (No. 42), <strong>Alaska</strong> (No. 43), and <strong>Kansas</strong> (No. 44).</li> </ul><p>Click <a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/measuring-model-ranking-state-public-charter-school-laws-2020">here</a> to read the full report: <em>Measuring Up to the Model: A Ranking of State Public Charter School Laws, Eleventh Edition.</em></p> <p>For a more in-depth discussion on the report with the author, <a href="https://ncsc.publiccharters.org/">register</a> for the 2020 National Charter Schools Conference hosted by the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools in Orlando, Florida from June 21 – June 24.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/96" hreflang="en">Nina Rees</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/169" hreflang="en">Charter School Model Law</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 24 Jan 2020 21:46:25 +0000 Reed 16645 at https://www.publiccharters.org New Report Highlights How Charter School Leaders of Color Build Strong School Culture to Drive Student Success https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/12/09/new-report-highlights-how-charter-school-leaders-color-build-strong-school <span>New Report Highlights How Charter School Leaders of Color Build Strong School Culture to Drive Student Success</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/reed" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reed</span></span> <span>Fri, 12/06/2019 - 14:34</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/press-release" hreflang="en">Press Release</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2019-12-09T12:00:00Z">December 9, 2019</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span>Washington, DC -- Today, the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools (National Alliance), in partnership with Public Impact, released “<a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/identity-and-charter-school-leadership-building-strong-school-culture">Identity and Charter School Leadership: Profiles of Leaders of Color Building a Strong School Culture.</a>” This final report in a three-part series examines how the experiences of leaders of color influenced them to build </span></span><span><span>a school environment where students learn, grow and thrive.</span></span> </span></span></p> <p>“This latest report supports the idea that an optimal school environment and culture do not just appear on their own. To the contrary, school leaders must take intentional steps to build a community where students believe in their potential and have the confidence to take the risks necessary to fulfill it,” said Amy Wilkins, senior vice president of advocacy at the National Alliance. “It was also clear that the profiled leaders take advantage of the autonomy provided by charter schools, which are all public schools, to introduce programs and practices that both expand students’ notion of what they can be and promote an inclusive school culture.”</p> <p>The leaders stand out for the thoughtful and deliberate ways they designed their schools:</p> <ul><li>Kathleen “Kathy” Wang, principal at Pioneer Valley Chinese Immersion Charter School in Hadley, MA, and her team use language to bring together students from diverse backgrounds and communities to create a common ground that cultivates respect and inclusion.</li> <li>Maurice Thomas, founder and executive director of Milwaukee Excellence Charter School in Milwaukee, WI, provides students with opportunities to follow their dreams and achieve beyond society’s expectations for them as Black students by learning to code, traveling, and exposure to a wide array of extra-curricular activities.</li> </ul><p><span><span><span><span>“A common thread across the profiles in this report is the importance of strong teacher-relationships in building a robust school culture,” said Daniela Doyle, vice president for policy and management research at Public Impact. “From creating safe spaces for students to bond with other students and teachers to designing a culture and curriculum that seeks to bridge socioeconomic gaps among students —we find that both charter school leaders of color use creative approaches to build the kind of positive school environment they see as largely missing elsewhere.”</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>The report also highlights three common themes across </span></span><span><span>all eight leaders profiled in this series, all related to their experiences as people of color:</span></span></span></span></p> <ol><li><span><span><strong><span><span>Addressing holes and creating opportunities based on personal experience. </span></span></strong><span><span>Based on holes in their own academic experiences as a person of color or as a child from a low-income family, the school leaders of color in this series often take nontraditional steps to address those same challenges in their own schools.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><strong><span><span>Emphasizing value over deficits.</span></span></strong><span><span> Many of the leaders in this series emphasized the value that students and their families offer rather than seeing their primary roles as compensating for or working around perceived deficits. </span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><strong><span><span>Providing an equitable educational experience to produce equitable student outcomes.</span></span></strong><span><span> The leaders of color included in this series work hard to give students an educational experience like that of their more advantaged peers—an experience full of art, sports, travel, and extracurriculars—as well as opportunities to learn from their mistakes. In some cases, they have even built their schools around themes and curricula seldom available in low-income districts.</span></span></span></span></li> </ol><p><span><span><span><span>The full report is now available online at: </span></span></span></span><a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/identity-and-charter-school-leadership-building-strong-school-culture">https://www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/identity-and-charter-school-leadership-building-strong-school-culture</a>.</p> <p><span><span><span><span>To speak with the report’s authors, the profiled school leaders of color or for more information about the National Alliance and Public Impact, please contact: </span></span><a href="mailto:Shaelyn@publiccharters.org">Shaelyn@publiccharters.org</a>.</span></span></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/153" hreflang="en">School Leaders of Color</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 06 Dec 2019 19:34:45 +0000 Reed 16207 at https://www.publiccharters.org New Report Highlights Innovative Ways Charter School Leaders of Color Engage Families to Support Students https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/11/18/new-report-highlights-innovative-ways-charter-school-leaders-color-engage <span>New Report Highlights Innovative Ways Charter School Leaders of Color Engage Families to Support Students</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/reed" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reed</span></span> <span>Thu, 11/14/2019 - 14:46</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/press-release" hreflang="en">Press Release</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2019-11-18T12:00:00Z">November 18, 2019</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Washington, D.C.</strong> – Today, the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools in partnership with Public Impact released <em>“<a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/profiles-leaders-color-engaging-families">Identity and Charter School Leadership: Profiles of Leaders of Color Engaging Families</a>,” </em>addressing how the experiences of three leaders of color influence how they interact with and invite families to participate in their children’s schools. The report is the second in a series of three reports profiling charter school leaders of color to show some of the ways their experiences and perspectives shape how they lead schools with excellence<em>.</em></p> <p>“Our goal for this research is to feature leaders of color in charter schools—which are all public schools—who are making a clear positive difference in their communities across the country,” said Amy Wilkins, senior vice president of advocacy at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. “Through these reports, we hope to shed light on some of the unique values leaders of color bring to their schools, and the thoughtful and effective practices that other leaders—regardless of their race or ethnicity—would be wise to adopt.”</p> <p>The leaders profiled in this report all stand out for the ways they engage families as genuine partners: </p> <ul><li><strong>Maquita Alexander</strong> is the executive director and head of school for Washington Yu Ying Public Charter School in Washington, D.C. Alexander looked to parents to play a leading role when she wanted to create a more inviting campus for students of all backgrounds and income levels. <br />  </li> <li><strong>Freddy Delgado</strong> is superintendent/principal at Amigos Por Vida Charter School in Houston, TX. Delgado has built on the school’s family-centered culture and reset expectations for parental involvement to focus on what students need to succeed. <br />  </li> <li><strong>Kriste Dragon</strong> is CEO and co-founder of Citizens of the World Charter Schools, a national network of charter schools in Los Angeles, CA, and Kansas City, MO. Dragon’s teams are constantly considering the systems and structures that make it more difficult for some families to engage at the same levels as others and adjusting how they involve and what they ask of parents. </li> </ul><p>The report also spotlights some of the unique challenges—and opportunities—of engaging diverse families. Two of the profiled leaders who serve students from different racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds found that all families are not equally positioned to learn about their schools or to participate in the schools once they arrive. This is in part because of their own experiences as people of color, however, the leaders at both schools have prioritized efforts to level the playing field.</p> <p>The report highlights common themes that ran across all eight profiles in the report series related to leaders' experiences as people of color:</p> <ul><li><strong>Addressing holes and creating opportunities based on personal experience. </strong>Based on holes in their own academic experiences as a person of color or as a child from a low-income family, several school leaders reported taking nontraditional steps to address those same challenges in their own schools.<br />  </li> <li><strong>Emphasizing value over deficits.</strong> Many of the leaders in this series emphasized the value students and their families offer rather than seeing their primary roles as compensating for or working around perceived deficits.<br />  </li> <li><strong>Providing an equitable educational experience to produce equitable student outcomes.</strong> The leaders of color included in this series work hard to provide students an educational experience like that of their more advantaged peers—an experience full of art, sport, travel, and extracurriculars—as well as opportunities to learn from their mistakes. In some cases, they have even built their schools around themes and curricula seldom available in low-income districts.</li> </ul><p>“The practices that we explore in this report are consistent with decades of research showing that students whose families are engaged in their education tend to perform better in school, regardless of family income, parent education, or racial background,” said Daniela Doyle, vice president for policy and management research at Public Impact. “Moreover, we find that the ways these three leaders choose to engage families reflect their own, very personal experiences as people of color.”</p> <p>The full report is now available online at: <a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/profiles-leaders-color-engaging-families">www.publiccharters.org/our-work/publications/profiles-leaders-color-engaging-families</a></p> <p>For more information about the report, the National Alliance or Public Impact, please contact: Shaelyn Macedonio at shaelyn@publiccharters.org.</p></div> Thu, 14 Nov 2019 19:46:02 +0000 Reed 16027 at https://www.publiccharters.org National Alliance Hires George Parker as Senior Advisor for School Support https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/11/04/national-alliance-hires-george-parker-senior-advisor-school-support <span>National Alliance Hires George Parker as Senior Advisor for School Support</span> <h4 class="field field--name-field-subtitle field--type-string-long field--label-hidden field--item">Veteran math teacher negotiated groundbreaking labor contract as former president of Washington Teachers’ Union</h4> <span><span lang="" about="/user/shaelyn" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">shaelyn</span></span> <span>Mon, 11/04/2019 - 16:36</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/press-release" hreflang="en">Press Release</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2019-11-04T12:00:00Z">November 4, 2019</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span>The National Alliance for Public Charter Schools is pleased to announce that <a href="https://www.publiccharters.org/about-us/staff/george-parker">George Parker</a>, a distinguished educator and expert on teaching and school governance, has joined the National Alliance as a senior advisor with a focus on school support. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Mr. Parker spent 30 years as a math teacher and educator in the District of Columbia Public Schools. For six years, Mr. Parker served as president of the Washington Teachers’ Union. During his tenure, he negotiated a groundbreaking collective bargaining agreement that implemented innovations in teacher pay, tenure and transfer policies, professional development, and equity in classroom resources. He subsequently played a major role in the design, implementation, and monitoring of the first local school-based shared decision-making model in the District. Mr. Parker frequently serves as an expert witness in support of legislation aimed at improving teacher quality, elevating the teaching profession, and promoting school choice. He also engages community organizations and serves on panels across the country to discuss policies related to student achievement, school choice, teacher and principal evaluations, teacher pay, community engagement, and labor relations.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>“We are thrilled to have someone of George Parker’s experience, skill, and vision on our team at the National Alliance,” said National Alliance President and CEO Nina Rees. “George’s passion for improving the lives of students has motivated his work as a teacher, union leader, and student advocate. He understands the critical connections between teacher quality, teacher empowerment, parental choice, and student success. He will help our movement immensely as we seek to improve the public school opportunities available to students, parents, and teachers everywhere.” </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Prior to joining the National Alliance, Mr. Parker worked with the <em>StudentsFirst</em> <em>Institute</em> as a senior fellow to successfully impact education reform nationally. He is a first-generation college graduate, having received his Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics from North Carolina Central University and a Master of Science degree in school administration from Trinity University. He continues to maintain a certified teaching license and is a highly qualified math teacher. Mr. Parker is also a former performer, producer, and songwriter for the 70/80’s R&amp;B recording group Special Delivery. He has performed at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and the world-renowned Apollo Theater. </span></span></p></div> Mon, 04 Nov 2019 21:36:56 +0000 shaelyn 15921 at https://www.publiccharters.org Public Charter Schools, Families, and the New Jersey Charter School Association Intervene In School Desegregation Lawsuit https://www.publiccharters.org/latest-news/2019/09/18/public-charter-schools-families-and-new-jersey-charter-school-association <span>Public Charter Schools, Families, and the New Jersey Charter School Association Intervene In School Desegregation Lawsuit</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/reed" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Reed</span></span> <span>Wed, 09/18/2019 - 12:11</span> <div class="uppercase field field--name-field-news-item-types field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/latest-news/category/press-release" hreflang="en">Press Release</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2019-09-18T12:00:00Z">September 18, 2019</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p class="text-align-center"><em>Lawsuit Unfairly Blames Charter Schools For School Segregation</em></p> <p><strong>WASHINGTON, D.C.</strong> - Today, a group of New Jersey public charter school parents, schools, and the state charter school association filed a motion to intervene in <em>Latino Action Network v. State of New Jersey</em>, a lawsuit filed in May 2018.</p> <p>In their misguided attacks on charter schools, Plaintiffs completely fail to acknowledge two fundamental facts:  that public charter schools are providing students in urban settings with a high-quality education; and, that public charter schools have been providing a solution to school segregation for years.</p> <p>Missing the mark, Plaintiffs cite data that public charter schools serve a disproportionate number of Black and Latino students in New Jersey, without indicating that most public charter schools operate in urban neighborhoods where a large majority of Black and Latino students live.  Moreover, Plaintiffs choose to ignore a critical truth:   because public charter schools in New Jersey can enroll students across municipal boundaries, parents who want to make the choice to enroll their students in a diverse-by-design charter school can – and many do.</p> <p>National Alliance Senior Director of Legal Affairs Rob Reed released the following statement:</p> <p>“Plaintiffs conveniently overlook the fact that New Jersey public charter schools are providing a remedy to school segregation and, as such, are part of the solution, not the problem. Charter schools are committed to providing a quality public school for every student, and Plaintiffs’ assumption that schools serving predominantly students of color are inherently low-performing is simply incorrect, as New Jersey charter schools prove. </p> <p>With more than 35,000 students – primarily from urban communities – on waitlists in New Jersey, we should be looking to find ways to increase opportunities for children to attend high-quality public charter schools; the public should not be misled, and charter schools should not be scapegoated for segregation, a serious issue that requires thoughtful wide-ranging solutions.</p> <p>A recent Urban Institute <strong><a href="https://www.educationnext.org/do-charter-schools-increase-segregation-first-national-analysis-reveals-modest-impact/">study</a></strong> found that New Jersey’s public charter schools did not contribute to school segregation and are instead leading the way in breaking down barriers of race and zip code as they may serve children across municipal boundaries. Rather than laying blame, it would be wise to learn how public charter schools are creating intentionally diverse schools and delivering on the promise of a high-quality education for Garden State students.”</p> <p>The National Charter School Legal Action Fund has supported this case since its inception and applauds charter school parents, the New Jersey Charter Schools Association and their partners for intervening in this case and valiantly fighting to protect parent choice while pushing back on the unfounded and deeply flawed notion that high-quality charter schools, chosen by parents and families of color, are the cause of school segregation in New Jersey.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/183" hreflang="en">Charter School Legal Action Fund</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 18 Sep 2019 16:11:03 +0000 Reed 15435 at https://www.publiccharters.org