Nevada

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Nevada

1997
Year Charter School Law Was Enacted
39
Estimated Number of Charter Schools in 2016-17
39,900
Estimated Number of Charter School Students in 2016-17
165
out of
240
Total Score

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Nevada’s law does not have a cap on charter public school growth and allows multiple authorizing entities. Over the past few years, Nevada has taken steps to improve its law by creating an independent state authorizer, strengthening accountability, and providing facilities support. Still, the law provides insufficient autonomy and inequitable funding to charter schools.

Potential areas for improvement include increasing operational autonomy, ensuring equitable operational funding and equitable access to capital funding and facilities, and strengthening accountability for full-time virtual charter schools.

Component Scores

Are there caps on the growth of charter schools in this state?

Nevada law does not place any caps on charter school growth.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Yes
1A
No numeric or geographic limits are placed on the number of charter public schools or students.
N/A
1B
If caps exist, there is room for growth.

Are a variety of charter schools allowed?

Nevada law allows new start-ups. It also allows the state to convert low-performing public schools into achievement charter schools.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Yes
2A
New startups.
Yes
2B
Public school conversions.

Are non-district authorizers available to which charter applicants may directly apply?

Nevada law allows applicants to seek approval from a local school board (if previously approved to be an authorizer by the state department of education), the State Public Charter School Authority, or a college or university within the Nevada System of Higher Education (if previously approved to be an authorizer by the state department of education).

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Yes
3A
The state allows an applicant anywhere in the state to apply directly to a non-district authorizer(s).

Is an authorizer and overall program accountability system required?

Nevada law requires local school boards and a college or university within the Nevada System of Higher Education to apply to the state department of education for authorization to authorize charter schools. It requires an entity’s application to be approved by the state department of education before it may authorize a charter school.
Nevada law requires each authorizer to submit an annual report to the state department of education that includes: for each charter school that it authorizes with a written charter, an evaluation of the progress of each such charter school in achieving the educational goals and objectives of the written charter; for each charter school that it authorizes with a charter contract, a summary evaluating the academic, financial and organizational performance of the charter school, as measured by the performance indicators, measures and metrics set forth in the performance framework for the charter school; an identification of each charter school approved by the authorizer which has not opened and the scheduled time for opening, if any, which is open and in operation, which has transferred authorization, whose written charter has been revoked or whose charter contract has been terminated by the authorizer, whose charter contract has not been renewed by the authorizer, and which has voluntarily ceased operation; a description of the strategic vision of the authorizer for the charter schools that it authorizes and the progress of the authorizer in achieving that vision; a description of the services provided by the authorizer pursuant to a service agreement entered into with the governing body of the charter school pursuant to state law, including an itemized accounting of the actual costs of those services; the amount of any money from the federal government that was distributed to the charter school, any concerns regarding the equity of such distributions and any recommendations on how to improve access to and distribution of money from the federal government.

Nevada law requires the state department of education to conduct a comprehensive review of the authorizers that it has approved at least once every three years.

The law allows the state department of education to determine whether to continue or to revoke the authorization of an entity to authorize charter schools.

Nevada law requires the state superintendent of public instruction to submit a periodic report to the Director of the Legislative Counsel Bureau for transmission to the next regular session of the Legislature that includes: a list of each application to form a charter school that was submitted to the board of trustees of a school district, the State Authority, a college or a university during the immediately preceding biennium; the educational focus of each charter school for which an application was submitted; the current status of the application; and, if the application was denied, the reasons for the denial.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Yes
4A
Registration process for school boards to affirm their interest in authorizing.
Yes
4B
Application process for other eligible authorizing entities (except a state charter schools commission).
Yes
4C
Authorizer submission of annual report.
Yes
4D
The ability for the state to conduct a review of an authorizer’s performance.
Yes
4E
The ability for the state to sanction an authorizer for poor performance, including suspending an authorizer’s authority to approve new schools.
Yes
4F
Periodic formal evaluation of overall state charter school program and outcomes.

Is there adequate authorizer funding?

Nevada law provides that authorizers receive a fee not to exceed 2% of the total amount of money apportioned to charter schools, except that charter schools meeting the requirements of law may request their sponsor to lower the amount to not less than 1%.
Upon completion of a school quarter, the law allows an authorizer to request reimbursement from a charter school for the administrative costs associated with authorization during that school year, including an itemized list of those costs.

Statute requires a separate contract for any services purchased from an authorizer by a charter school board, excluding those services covered by the sponsorship fee. The law also provides a prohibition on authorizers requiring schools to purchase any services from them.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Yes
5A
A uniform statewide formula that guarantees annual authorizer funding that is not subject to annual legislative appropriations.
Yes
5B
Requirement to publicly report detailed authorizer expenditures.
Yes
5C
Separate contract for any services purchased from an authorizer by a school.
Yes
5D
Prohibition on authorizers requiring schools to purchase services from them.

Are there transparent charter application, review, and decisionmaking processes?

Nevada law and regulation contains application elements for all schools and additional application elements specific to educational service providers and replications.
The law requires authorizers to thoroughly evaluate each application with an in-person interview and a public meeting.
Nevada law requires all charter approval or denial decisions to be made in a public meeting, with authorizers stating reasons for denials in writing.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Yes
6A
Application elements for all schools.
N/A
6B
Additional application elements specific to conversion schools.
Yes
6C
Additional application elements specific to using educational service providers.
Yes
6D
Additional application elements specific to replications.
Yes
6E
Requirement for thorough evaluation of each application, including an in-person interview and a public meeting.
No
6F
Application approval criteria.
Yes
6G
All charter approval or denial decisions made in a public meeting with authorizers stating reasons for denials in writing.

Are performance-based charter contracts required?

Nevada law requires charter contracts be executed by the governing body of a charter school and the authorizer of the charter school and include a description of the administrative relationship between the authorizer and the charter school, including, without limitation, the rights and duties of the authorizer and the charter school.
The law requires charter contracts to define academic, financial, and organizational performance expectations by which the school will be judged based on a performance framework

The law provides that a written charter contract must be for a term of six years.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Yes
7A
Being created as a separate document from the application and executed by the governing board of the charter school and the authorizer.
Yes
7B
Defining the roles, powers, and responsibilities for the school and its authorizer.
Yes
7C
Defining academic, financial, and operational performance expectations by which the school will be judged based on a performance framework.
No
7D
Providing an initial term of five operating years.

Are there comprehensive charter school monitoring and data collection processes?

The law requires authorizers to ensure the collection, analysis, and reporting of all data from the results of pupils enrolled in the charter school on statewide examinations to determine whether the charter school is meeting the performance indicators, measures, and metrics for the achievement and proficiency of pupils as set forth in the performance framework for the charter school.
Nevada law requires a charter school to submit an annual budget report to its authorizer, the state superintendent of public instruction, and the Director of the Legislative Counsel Bureau for transmission to the Majority Leader of the Senate and the Speaker of the Assembly. The law provides that a governing body of a charter school must cause the charter school to be audited on an annual basis.

The law requires that all authorizers must prepare an annual public report of accountability, including provisions required by law and the state department of education.

Statute explicitly states that authorizers must monitor their schools.

The law requires authorizers to notify schools of problems and ask them to remedy them (or at least provide a summary of how they are planning on remedying them) by a certain date.

The law allows authorizers to proceed with consequences or sanctions or both if problems are found and not resolved.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Yes
8A
Required annual school performance reports.
Yes
8B
Financial accountability for charter schools (e.g., generally accepted accounting principles, independent annual audit reported to authorizer).
Yes
8C
Authorizer authority to conduct oversight activities.
Yes
8D
Authorizer notification to its schools of perceived problems, with opportunities to remedy such problems.
Yes
8E
Authorizer authority to take appropriate corrective actions or exercise sanctions short of revocation.
No
8F
Authorizer may not request duplicative data submission from its charter schools and may not use performance framework to create cumbersome reporting requirements.

Are there clear processes for renewal, nonrenewal, and revocation decisions?

Nevada law requires authorizers to issue school performance renewal reports to schools whose charter will expire the following year, requires charter schools seeking renewal to apply for it, and provides renewal application requirements and timelines.
Nevada regulations allow authorizers to have a differentiated process for renewal of high-performing charter schools.

Nevada law requires that an authorizer’s renewal decisions be based upon the criteria of the authorizer for the renewal of charter contracts and evidence of the performance of the charter school during the term of the charter contract in accordance with the performance framework for the charter school.

Nevada law provides that an authorizer may reconstitute the governing body of a charter school, revoke a written charter, or terminate a charter contract before the expiration of the charter if the sponsor determines that: the charter school, its officers, or its employees committed a material breach of the terms and conditions of the written charter or charter contract, failed to comply with generally accepted standards of fiscal management, failed to comply with the provisions of the state’s charter law or any other statute or regulation applicable to charter schools, or if the charter school holds a charter contract, has persistently underperformed, as measured by the performance indicators, measures, and metrics set forth in the performance framework for the charter school; the charter school has filed for a voluntary petition of bankruptcy, is adjudicated bankrupt or insolvent, or is otherwise financially impaired such that the charter school cannot continue to operate; there is reasonable cause to believe that revocation or termination is necessary to protect the health and safety of the pupils who are enrolled in the charter school or persons who are employed by the charter school from jeopardy, or to prevent damage to or loss of the property of the school district or the community in which the charter school is located; the authorizer determines that the committee to form the charter school or charter management organization, as applicable, or any member of the committee to form the charter school or charter management organization, as applicable, or the governing body of the charter school has at any time made a material misrepresentation or omission concerning any information disclosed to the sponsor; the charter school is a high school that has a graduation rate for the immediately preceding school year that is less than 60 percent; the charter school is an elementary or middle school or junior high school that is rated in the lowest 5 percent of elementary schools, middle schools or junior high schools in the State in pupil achievement and school performance, as determined by the Department pursuant to the statewide system of accountability for public schools; or pupil achievement and school performance at the charter school is unsatisfactory as determined by the Department pursuant to criteria prescribed by regulation by the Department to measure the performance of any public school.

Nevada law provides that the authorizer of a charter school shall revoke the written charter or terminate the charter contract of the charter school or restart the charter school under a new charter contract if the charter school receives three annual ratings established as the lowest rating possible indicating underperformance of a public school for any three out of five years, as determined by the state department of education pursuant to the statewide system of accountability for public schools.

Nevada law requires authorizers to provide charter schools with timely notification of potential reconstitution, revocation, termination, and non-renewal decisions, a reasonable time to respond, and due process.

Nevada law provides that renewal contract terms are for six years. It does not allow authorizers to vary the length of charter renewal contract terms based on performance or other issues.

Nevada law requires governing bodies of charter schools that cease to operate voluntarily or upon revocation of their written charter contract to appoint an administrator of the charter school to act as a trustee during the process of the closure of the charter school and for one year after the date of closure.

State law notes that no charter contract is assignable or transferable and may not be delegated to a third party.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Yes
9A
Authorizer must issue school performance renewal reports to schools whose charter will expire the following year.
Yes
9B
Schools seeking renewal must apply for it.
Yes
9C
Authorizers must issue renewal application guidance that provides an opportunity for schools to augment their performance record and discuss improvements and future plans.
Yes
9D
Ability to have a differentiated process for renewal of high-performing charter schools.
Yes
9E
Authorizers must use clear criteria for renewal and nonrenewal/revocation.
Yes
9F
Authorizers must ground renewal decisions based on evidence regarding the school’s performance over the term of the charter contract in accordance with the performance framework set forth in the charter contract.
Yes
9G
Requirement that authorizers close chronically low-performing charter schools unless exceptional circumstances exist.
Yes
9H
Authorizers must have the authority to vary length of charter renewal contract terms based on performance or other issues.
Yes
9I
Authorizers must provide charter schools with timely notification of potential revocation or nonrenewal (including reasons) and reasonable time to respond.
Yes
9J
Authorizers must provide charter schools with due process for nonrenewal and revocation decisions (e.g., public hearing, submission of evidence).
Yes
9K
All charter renewal, nonrenewal, and revocation decisions must be made in a public meeting, with authorizers stating reasons for nonrenewals and revocations in writing.
Yes
9L
Authorizers must have school closure protocols to ensure timely parent notification, orderly student and record transitions, and property and asset disposition.
No
9M
Any transfer of charter contracts from one authorizer to another are only allowed if they are approved by the state.

Is there transparency regarding educational service providers?

Nevada laws and regulations allow charters to contract with educational service providers, require that certain information be provided in the charter application, require a performance contract between the charter and the provider, require the contract to be approved by the authorizer, require the charter to operate independently of the provider, and require conflicts of interest to be disclosed.
While the law does not require that an ESP annually provide information to its charter school governing board on how that ESP spends public funding, there are several provisions that prevent an ESP from being able to hide expenditures from a governing board or authorizer.

The law requires that any information provided to a charter school authorizer by a charter management company is a public record, unless a school requests such information to be confidential and the authorizer agrees.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Yes
10A
All types of educational service providers (both for-profit and nonprofit) are allowed to operate all or parts of schools.
Yes
10B
The charter application requires (1) performance data for all current and past schools operated by the ESP, and (2) explanation and evidence of the ESP’s capacity for successful growth while maintaining quality in existing schools.
Yes
10C
A performance contract is required between the independent charter school board and the ESP, with such contract approved by the school’s authorizer.
Some
10D
School governing boards operate as entities completely independent of any ESP, individuals compensated by an ESP are prohibited from serving as voting members on such boards, and existing and potential conflicts of interest between the two entities are required to be disclosed and explained in the charter application.
Some
10E
Provides that charter school governing boards must have access to ESP records necessary to oversee the ESP contract.
Some
10F
An ESP must annually provide information to its charter school governing board on how that ESP spends public funding it receives when the ESP is performing a public function under applicable state law.
No
10G
Requires that similar criminal history record checks and fingerprinting requirements applicable to other public schools shall also be mandatory for on-site employees of ESPs who regularly come into contact with students.

Are the schools fiscally and legally autonomous with independent charter school boards?

Nevada law provides for fiscally and legally autonomous schools with independent charter school boards.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Yes
11A
Fiscally autonomous schools (e.g., schools have clear statutory authority to receive and disburse funds; incur debt; and pledge, assign, or encumber assets as collateral).
Yes
11B
Legally autonomous schools (e.g., schools have clear statutory authority to enter into contracts and leases, sue and be sued in their own names, and acquire real property).
Yes
11C
Independent school governing boards created specifically to govern their charter schools.

Are there clear student enrollment and lottery procedures?

Nevada law requires public charter schools to be open to any student in the state that wishes to enroll. If a charter school is sponsored by a local school board of a school district located in a county whose population is 100,000 or more, the law requires the charter school to enroll pupils who are eligible for enrollment who reside in the school district in which the charter school is located before enrolling pupils who reside outside the school district, except for a program of distance education provided by the charter school.
Nevada’s law includes anti-discrimination provisions regarding admissions.

Nevada law provides that before a charter school enrolls pupils who are eligible for enrollment, a charter school may enroll a child who is a sibling of a pupil who is currently enrolled in the charter school, was enrolled, free of charge, and on the basis of a lottery system in a prekindergarten program at the charter school or any other early childhood education program affiliated with the charter school, is a child of a person who is employed by the charter school, who is a member of the committee to form the school, who is a member of the governing body of the school, or who resides on or is employed on the federal military installation if the charter school is located on a federal military installation, is enrolled in a charter school that has an articulation agreement approved by the authorizer, is in a particular category of at-risk pupils and the child meets the eligibility for enrollment prescribed by the charter school for that particular category, is enrolled in a public school of a school district with an enrollment that is more than 25 percent over the public school’s intended capacity and is located within two miles of the charter school, is enrolled in a public school that received an annual rating established as one of the two lowest ratings possible indicating underperformance of the public school in the immediately preceding school year and is located within two miles of the charter school, or resides within the school district and within two miles of the charter school if the charter school is located in an area that the authorizer of the charter school determines includes a high percentage of children who are at risk. If space is available after the charter school enrolls such pupils, the law allows a charter school to enroll children who reside outside the school district but within two miles of the charter school if the charter school is located within an area that the authorizer determines includes a high percentage of children who are at risk.

The law provides that any pupil who was enrolled in a school before conversion to a charter school in the achievement school district must be enrolled in the charter school unless the parent or guardian of the pupil submits written notice that the pupil will not continue to be enrolled at the school.

Nevada law also states that If the local school board of the school district in which the charter school is located has established zones of attendance, the charter school must, if practicable, ensure that the racial composition of pupils enrolled in the charter school does not differ by more than 10% from the racial composition of pupils who attend public schools in the zone in which the charter school is located.

The law requires a charter school that is restarted to enroll a pupil who was enrolled in the charter school before the school was restarted before any other eligible pupil is enrolled.

Nevada law requires that in a county in which more than five charter schools are located and the total number of pupils enrolled in the charter schools exceeds 25 percent of the combined enrollment of all public schools, including, without limitation, charter schools, the state department of education shall, in consultation with all authorizers of charter schools in the county, determine whether holding a weighted lottery for admission to charter schools would improve diversity in charter schools that do not have a preference for at-risk pupils. If the department determines that a weighted lottery for admission to charter schools would improve diversity in such charter schools, the department shall, to the extent authorized by federal law, adopt regulations authorizing charter schools to establish a weighted lottery.

Nevada law requires that in a county in which more than ten charter schools are located and the total number of pupils enrolled in charter schools exceeds 50 percent of the combined enrollment of all public schools, including, without limitation, charter schools, the department shall, in consultation with all authorizers of charter schools in the county:

* Adopt regulations establishing a uniform enrollment calendar and process for enrolling pupils applicable to all charter schools in the county. The regulations must establish a lottery for admission to each charter school in the county. If a charter school does not have a preference for at-risk pupils, the lottery must, to the extent authorized by federal law, be a weighted lottery.
* Allow the board of trustees of the school district to provide input regarding the enrollment calendar, processes for enrolling pupils, and lotteries established.

Nevada law requires charter schools to hold lotteries if too many students seek enrolment in the school.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Yes
12A
Open enrollment to any student in the state.
Yes
12B
Anti-discrimination provisions regarding admissions.
Some
12C
Required enrollment preferences for previously enrolled students within conversions and for prior-year students within charter schools.
Yes
12D
Lottery requirements.

Is there automatic exemption from many state and district laws and regulations?

Nevada law allows a charter school to submit a written request to the state superintendent of public instruction for a waiver from providing the days of instruction required by state law. The law allows the state superintendent of public instruction to grant the request if the charter school demonstrates to the satisfaction of the state superintendent that extenuating circumstances exist to justify the waiver and that the charter school will provide at least as many hours or minutes of instruction as would be provided under a program consisting of the days of instruction required by state law.
Nevada law provides the following teacher certification requirements for charters:

(1) At least 70% of the teachers who provide instruction at a charter school must be highly qualified. Highly qualified is defined as holding a state teaching license in schools that have not achieved one of the three highest performance ratings in the previous two year. It is defined as having at least a bachelor’s degree and demonstrating subject expertise on state assessments in schools that have achieved one of the three highest performance ratings in the previous two years.
(2) In a vocational charter school, at least 50% of the teachers who provide instruction must be highly qualified.
(3) A teacher that provides instruction in the following subjects must be highly qualified: English, reading or language arts; mathematics; science; foreign language; civics or government; economics; geography; history; or the arts.
(4) If a charter school specializes in arts and humanities, physical education, or health education, a highly qualified teacher must teach those courses of study.
(5) If a charter school specializes in the construction industry or other building industry, full-time teachers must hold licenses issued by the state that contain an endorsement to teach courses related to business and industry.
(6) A charter school may employ a person who is not highly qualified to teach a course of study for which a highly qualified teacher is not required if the person has a degree, a license, or a certificate in the field for which he is employed to teach at the charter school and at least two years of experience in that field.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Some
13A
Exemptions from all laws, except those covering health, safety, civil rights, student accountability, employee criminal history checks, open meetings, freedom of information, and generally accepted accounting principles.
Some
13B
Exemption from state teacher certification requirements.

Is there an automatic collective bargaining exemption?

Nevada law provides that charter schools are exempt from district collective bargaining agreements.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Yes
14A
Charter schools authorized by nonlocal board authorizers are exempt from participation in any outside collective bargaining agreements.
Yes
14B
Charter schools authorized by local boards are exempt from participation in any district collective bargaining agreements.

Are multischool charter contracts and/or multicharter contract boards allowed?

Nevada law allows charter boards to hold multiple contracts and requires independent accountability for each school.
Nevada law also allows public charter schools to consolidate and form a single charter school operating one or more campuses under a new charter contract. It does not require independent accountability for each school, though. However, the state must consider the academic performance of individual campuses before submitting any grant application that may result in funds being distributed to a school or its authorizer.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Some
15A
Oversee multiple schools linked under a single contract with independent fiscal and academic accountability for each school.
Yes
15B
Hold multiple charter contracts with independent fiscal and academic accountability for each school.

Is there eligibility and access to extracurricular and interscholastic activities?

Nevada law allows charter school students in schools not providing extra-curricular and interscholastic activities to have access to those activities at non-charter public schools by a mutual agreement.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
No
16A
Laws or regulations explicitly state that charter school students and employees are eligible to participate in all extracurricular and interscholastic activities available to noncharter public school students and employees.
Yes
16B
Laws or regulations explicitly allow charter school students in schools not providing extracurricular and interscholastic activities to have access to those activities at noncharter public schools.

Is there clear identification of special education responsibilities?

Nevada law provides that the State Public Charter School Authority is the LEA for charters authorized by it and a college or university within the Nevada System of Higher Education. It also allows the Authority to select up to two of its schools to act as their own LEAs. The law does not provide similar clarity for charters authorized by school districts or regarding funding for low-incident, high-cost services for charter schools in the same amount or in a manner similar to other LEAs.
If the authorizer is the State Public Charter School Authority or a college or university within the Nevada System of Higher Education, law and regulation provide that a written charter contract must set forth the responsibilities of the authorizer and the charter school with regard to the provision of services and programs to pupils with disabilities who are enrolled in the charter school in accordance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. This provision does not apply to charters authorized by local school boards.

The law provides that if the governing body of a charter school determines that the charter school is unable to provide an appropriate special education program and related services for a particular disability of a pupil who is enrolled in the charter school, the governing body may request that the board of trustees of the school district of the county in which the pupil resides transfer that pupil to an appropriate school.

It also provides that a charter school is entitled to receive its proportionate share of any other money available from federal, state, or local sources that the school or the pupils who are enrolled in the school are eligible to receive.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Some
17A
Clarity regarding which entity is the local education agency (LEA) responsible for providing special education services.
Yes
17B
Clarity regarding the flow of federal, state, and local special education funds to the designated LEA.
No
17C
Clarity regarding funding for low-incident, high-cost services for charter schools (in the same amount and/or in a manner similar to other LEAs).
No
17D
Clarity that charter schools have access to all regional and state services and supports available to traditional districts.

Is there equitable operational funding and equal access to all state and federal categorical funding?

Nevada law includes some of the model law’s provisions for equitable operational and categorical funding, but there is no evidence of the amount of funds charters receive versus districts.
Nevada law provides that each pupil who is enrolled in a charter school, including, without limitation, a pupil who is enrolled in a program of special education in a charter school, must be included in the count of pupils in the school district for the purposes of apportionments and allowances from the State Distributive School Account.

It also provides that a charter school is entitled to receive its proportionate share of any other money available from federal, state, or local sources that the school or the pupils who are enrolled in the school are eligible to receive.

The law does not provide funding for transportation similar to school districts.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Some
18A
Equitable operational funding statutorily driven.
Some
18B
Equal access to all applicable categorical federal and state funding and clear guidance on the pass-through of such funds.
No
18C
Funding for transportation similar to school districts.
No
18D
Annual report offering district and charter school funding comparisons and including annual recommendations to the legislature for any needed equity enhancements.

Is there equitable access to capital funding and facilities?

Nevada law includes a small number of the model law’s provisions for equitable access to capital funding and facilities.Nevada law provides charter schools with access to the State-sponsored Account for Charter Schools, a revolving loan fund. The Account for Charter Schools revolving loan fund was funded for the first time in 2013 with a one-time State appropriation of $750,000. This funding must be used to make loans at or below market rate to charter schools for costs incurred in preparing a charter school to commence its first year of operations or to improve a charter school that has been in operation. The maximum loan amount is the lesser of $500 per pupil or $200,000. Repayment must be completed in three years.

Nevada law authorizes the Director of the Department of Business and Industry to issue bonds and other obligations to finance the acquisition, construction, improvement, restoration, or rehabilitation of property, buildings, and facilities for charter schools.
Nevada law allows charter schools to contract with school districts for the use of facilities at a cost no more than the amount of per pupil dollars the district would otherwise spend on the building.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Facilities Funding
No
19A
A per-pupil facilities allowance that annually reflects actual average district capital costs.
No
19B
A state grant program for charter school facilities.
No
19C
Equal access to existing state facilities programs available to noncharter public schools.
Access to Public Space
No
19D
A requirement for districts to provide school district space or funding to charter schools if the majority of that schools’ students reside in that district.
No
19E
Right of first refusal to purchase or lease at or below fair market value a closed, unused, or underused public school facility or property.
Access to Financing Tools
Yes
19F
A state loan program for charter school facilities.
Yes
19G
Equal access to tax-exempt bonding authorities or allowing charter schools to have their own bonding authority
No
19H
Pledging the moral obligation of the state to help charter schools obtain more favorable bond financing terms.
No
19I
The creation and funding of a state charter school debt reserve fund.
No
19J
The inclusion of charter schools in school district bonding and mill levy requests.
No
19K
A mechanism to provide credit enhancement for charter school facilities.
Other
Some
19L
Charter schools allowed to contract at or below fair market value with a school district, a college or university, or any other public or for-profit or nonprofit private entity for the use of facility for a school building.
No
19M
Certain entities allowed to provide space to charter schools within their facilities under their preexisting zoning and land use designations.
No
19N
Charter school facilities exempt from ad valorem taxes and other assessment fees not applicable to other public schools.

Is there access to relevant employee retirement systems?

Nevada law requires participation in the relevant employee retirement systems.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
Yes
20A
Charter schools have access to relevant state retirement systems available to other public schools.
No
20B
Charter schools have the option to participate (i.e., not required).

Are there provisions for full-time virtual charter schools?

Nevada law does not include any of the model law’s provisions regarding full-time virtual charter schools.

Subcomponents

Key
Yes
Some
No
No
21A
An authorizing structure whereby full-time virtual charter schools that serve students from more than one district may be approved only by an authorizer with statewide chartering jurisdiction and authority, full-time virtual charter schools that serve students from one school district may be authorized by that school district, and a cap is placed on the total amount of funding that an authorizer may withhold from a full-time virtual charter school.
No
21B
Legally permissible criteria and processes for enrollment based on the existence of supports needed for student success.
No
21C
Enrollment level provisions that establish maximum enrollment levels for each year of a charter contract, with any increases in enrollment from one year to the next based on whether the school meets its performance requirements.
No
21D
Accountability provisions that include virtual-specific goals regarding student enrollment, attendance, engagement, achievement, truancy, and attrition.
No
21E
Funding levels per student based on costs proposed and justified by the operators.
No
21F
Performance-based funding whereby full-time virtual charter schools are funded via a performance-based funding system based on meeting the accountability performance provisions.