Three Reasons for Students to Apply to Be Rising Leaders

lead image

Group of charter high school students

If you haven't heard about our new Rising Leaders Initiative yet, let me give you a quick recap: We're recruiting ten charter high school students from across the country and supporting them to develop advocacy clubs in their schools to address the education policy changes needed in their communities.

But we need your help in identifying the students who are right for this program! Here are three reasons for students to apply:

1. Student Perspective is Important

Students have a unique – and crucial – role in education policy. They're the ones most affected by the decisions made. And, given that perspective, they must have a voice in helping shape policy decisions.

Elevating student voice isn't just a 'feel good' kind of thing—it’s what education advocacy is all about. And through this program, we will train and empower students to become active and knowledgeable advocates.

2. Leadership Development

The Rising Leaders Initiative is also a leadership development program. Participating students will receive the training and tools needed to create and run advocacy clubs in their schools. Students will develop an action plan, recruit student and faculty support, and write a funding proposal for their club. Not only that, but students will also have the opportunity to sharpen their networking and public speaking skills.

3. Investing in the Next Generation

Our program aspires to build a national network of diverse student-leaders who will be the next generation. And for us, that means investing resources into the program to support students. Students can expect training led by experts in policy, advocacy, communications, and leadership. There's also a $3,000 stipend for students for their year-long commitment and funding to start the advocacy clubs.

 Learn more about our Rising Leader Initiative and pass on this opportunity to your charter high school students!

 

Sindy Pierre-Noel is the director of programs at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.

Comments