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National Alliance for Public Charter Schools Applauds Six Charter Schools Recognized on “The Oprah Winfrey Show”

For Immediate Release: Contact: Sarah Johnson, 202.521.2826 $6 Million Awarded to High-Performing Charter Schools During Special Broadcast About New Documentary Film “Waiting for Superman;” Dialogue to Continue in Live “Oprah” Show on September 24 WASHINGTON, D.C. — The National Alliance for Public Charter Schools is proud to recognize six public charter schools honored with cash awards of $1 million each during the Sept. 20 broadcast of “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” Oprah Winfrey, host of “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” will continue her discussion about reforming America’s schools in a live broadcast on Friday, Sept. 24. The National Alliance for Public Charter Schools urges the entire nation to tune into this exciting show to learn more about what we must all do to ensure every child has access to a high-quality public education. The following schools were highlighted during a special show on Sept. 20 promoting the new documentary film, “Waiting for Superman,” which explores the challenges facing public education in America:
  • The Mastery Charter Schools of Philadelphia
  • Aspire Public Schools in California
  • Denver School of Science and Technology
  • LEARN Charter School in Chicago
  • New Orleans Charter Science and Math Academy
  • and YES Prep Public Schools in Houston
“We couldn’t be more proud of these outstanding public charter schools whose ‘no excuses’ philosophy have built a culture of high achievement for all their students,” said Peter C. Groff, president and CEO, National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. “Parents across the country are clamoring for the chance to enroll their children in unique, high-performing public charter schools like these. ‘Waiting for Superman’ tells their stories and forces viewers to confront some ugly truths about the separate but unequal system of public education in America,” he added. ‘Waiting for Superman’ goes inside the lives of five young people whose educational futures hang in the balance, as they hope for a chance to attend a great public school that has more applicants than seats. Each of the great schools profiled in the film is a public charter school. Charter schools are tuition-free, public schools that are closing the achievement gap. During her show, Oprah Winfrey conceded, “There is no easy fix for failing schools in our country, but there are some schools that are getting it right big-time. We invited the founders, the principals, and teachers from those six innovative schools. I know there are so many more, but we invited them. They are the real-life superheroes of education.” This is the 25th and final season of “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” Ms. Winfrey chose this issue and this particular broadcast to award the final grants from the Angel Network, a public charity that raised more than $80 million since its inception, and was made possible by donations from her viewers. “Today, we’re here with founders, with principals and teachers from some of the most groundbreaking schools in the country. These school leaders are doing whatever it takes, taking the hours and the sacrifice to make sure that children in our country, your children, succeed, and I value nothing more in the world than education. It is the reason why I can stand here today. It is an open door to freedom. And we wanted to be able to, on behalf of the viewers, give you something to go back to your schools and make life better for the children in your schools. So the Angel Network is giving each of your charter school networks $1 million,” said Oprah Winfrey. “I urge every American to see ‘Waiting for Superman,’ and I applaud Ms. Winfrey for using her personal passion and commitment as a way to draw the public’s attention to this important issue. No child’s education should be left to chance, and Ms. Winfrey has challenged us all to do better,” said Groff. “Waiting for Superman” will debut in theaters in New York and Los Angeles on Sept. 24, and in cities across America in October. To learn more about the film, or to take the pledge to see it, visit www.waitingforsuperman.org. To learn more about how public charter schools are changing the face of public education, visit http://www.publiccharters.org/. The National Alliance for Public Charter Schools (Alliance) is the national nonprofit organization committed to advancing the charter school movement. The Alliance works to increase the number of high-performing charter schools available to all families, particularly low-income and minority families who currently do not have access to quality public schools. The Alliance provides assistance to state charter school associations and resource centers, develops and advocates for improved public policies, and serves as the united voice for this large and diverse movement. More than 1.6 million students attend nearly 5,000 charter schools in 39 states and the District of Columbia.