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Nick Fickler

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Media Round Up

NAPCS in the News
  • “Why the GOP Should Get On Board With Preschool,” op-ed by Nina Rees (President & CEO), U.S. News & World Report, Feb. 3
  • “Preferential treatment: Fed eases rules to admit disadvantaged students through lotteries,” Nina quoted, Watchdog, Feb. 3
  • “Threshold staff, students celebrate school choice,” National Alliance mentioned, Ionia Sentinel-Standard, Feb. 4
News to Know
  • “Charging Rent for New York Charters Hits Wrinkle,” Wall Street Journal, Feb. 7
  • “Editorial: A Bad Deal for D.C. Charter Schools,” Washington Post, Feb. 6
  • “Charter School Inequality,” Houston Chronicle, Feb. 5
  • “De Blasio Says He Won’t Allow Co-Locations for Charter Schools,” New York Post, Feb. 4
  • “Washington State Approves Its First Batch of Charter Schools,” Education Week, Feb. 3
  Audience Favorites Facebook— Can attending a charter high school help you go to college and make more money? Our latest blog post has the answer Twitter—Study: #charterschool students earn more than traditional public school peers cc: @MathPolResearch bit.ly/1k7I16f  You can stay up to date on all the developments in the public charter school sector by subscribing to our regular news updates…Sign up here.  
Nick Fickler

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Media Round Up

NAPCS in the News
  •  “Charter School Enrollment Climbs 13 Percent,” Nina  quoted, Budget &Tax News , Mar. 5
  •  “Obama’s Budget Boosts Preschool, Access To Top Teachers, But Freezes Many Education Programs,” Nina quoted, Huffington Post, Mar. 4
News to Know
  • “More Support for New York City’s Charter Schools,” New York Post, Mar. 7
  • “New Jersey Renews 10 Charters, Revokes Two; Launches ‘Renaissance’ Charter in Camden,” Star Ledger, Mar. 6
  • “New York Governor Pledges Support to Charters,” New York Times, Mar. 5
  • “Commission Approves Maine’s First Virtual Charter School,” Portland Press Herald, Mar. 4
  • “New Orleans Goes All In On Charter Schools. Is It Showing The Way?,” Christian Science Monitor, Mar. 3
Audience Favorites Facebook— 194 children, 194 dreams. Don’t let NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio close Success Academy Harlem Central. #SaveThe194 Twitter— Great image from @Fam4ExcSchools, shows impact of @BilldeBlasio‘s latest move against #NYC charters. #SaveThe194 pic.twitter.com/9wLlYduYxs You can stay up to date on all the developments in the public charter school sector by subscribing to our regular news updates…Sign up here.
Nick Fickler

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Media Round Up

NAPCS in the News
  • “3 Things That Should Be Done to Help Rural Schools,” op-ed by Nina Rees (President & CEO), U.S. News & World Report, Feb. 11
  • “Texas adds 52 charter schools, 4th most nationwide,” National Alliance mentioned, Houston Chronicle, Feb. 12
  • “Charter schools: California leads nation in school openings, students,” Nina quoted, San Jose Mercury News, Feb. 13
  • “Killing the golden goose,” National Alliance mentioned, The Economist, Feb. 14
News to Know
  • “Charter Schools Are Working, But New York’s Mayor Wants to Stop Them,” Economist, Feb. 14
  • “Charter School Student Population Tops 2.5 Million,” Education Week, Feb. 13
  • “Raising the Bar on San Diego Charter Schools – Again,” Voice of San Diego, Feb. 12
  • “Study: Charging Rent Would Lead to Charter School Decline,” National Review, Feb. 11
  • “The War on Charter Kids,” Fox News, Feb. 10
  Audience Favorites Facebook— Thanks to the work of dedicated teachers, school leaders, and community members across the country, more than 2.5 million students now attend nearly 6,500 charter schools. That’s 288,000 new students this school year! Read more here to find out how your state did: http://bit.ly/1m7mFrK Twitter— Did you know charter schools added 288,000 new students this school year? bit.ly/1m7mFrK You can stay up to date on all the developments in the public charter school sector by subscribing to our regular news updates…Sign up here.
Katherine Bathgate

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194 Children. 194 Dreams.

Far too many students don’t have the educational opportunities they deserve, but one school in Harlem, New York is changing that. Success Academy Harlem 4 is one of the top-performing schools in the entire state, but instead of supporting their remarkable success, Mayor Bill de Blasio has decided to shut down their school. Who will be hurt by his decision? These kids:

Harlem 4 Ad NYT

Add your voice to the thousands of parents and families trying to keep this NYC school open. Sign their petition here. Katherine Bathgate is the Senior Manager for Communications and Marketing at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. 

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Strengthening Wisconsin’s Charter School Law

Across the country, support for public charter schools comes from both Democrats and Republicans. Like presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton before him, President Barack Obama has praised public charter schools. Opposition to charter schools also sometimes comes from both parties. In fact, there are still portions of the country where “do not rock the boat” Republicans lock arms with Democrats that oppose charters to block common sense proposals for the expansion of high-quality public charter schools. Unfortunately, that’s the case in Wisconsin. As some of my fellow legislators continue to fight against proven reforms like charter schools, it’s clear to me that the boat needs rocking. During a recent discussion in the Wisconsin Assembly Education Committee, I was astounded when one of my colleagues (who is an educator, no less!) stated that education policy changes are unnecessary in Wisconsin because we outpace many states on our reading, science, and math scores. To me, this logic is flawed. Finding comfort in the fact we outpace other states while the country falls further behind in international rankings does a significant disservice to our students. Despite these hurdles, Wisconsin’s Senator Alberta Darling and I have introduced a bill that makes important changes to our weak charter school law (currently ranked #37 out of 43 by the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools). The changes we are proposing will provide more opportunities for Wisconsin’s students. The Assembly version of this bill, AB 549, will be heard in the Assembly Urban Education Committee on Thursday, January 9th. While the bill makes a number of changes, here are two of the most important ones: First, the bill will expand the types of entities that can serve as charter school authorizers.   Right now, the only entities allowed to authorize a charter school are the City of Milwaukee (in the Milwaukee Public School district only), the University of Wisconsin (UW)-Milwaukee (in Milwaukee County or an adjacent county), UW-Parkside (only one school in Racine County or an adjacent county), Milwaukee Area Technical College (they have never exercised the option and can only create a charter school in the Milwaukee Public School district), and local school boards. The bill would expand the authorization agents to also include any of the other 11 UW institutions and campuses, any of the other 15 technical colleges, and any of the state’s 12 Cooperative Educational Service Agencies. This change will better facilitate the creation of autonomous and accountable public charter schools across the state. Second, the bill will revise and clarify Wisconsin’s charter school categories. Currently, Wisconsin has three types of charters:
      1.    Those that are authorized by the City of Milwaukee, UW-Milwaukee, UW-Parkside, and the Milwaukee Area Technical College. These schools have autonomy and are similar to charters in most other states. They are referred to as “2r charters.”
      2.    Those that are authorized by local school boards and employ their own teachers.  These schools have autonomy and are also similar to charters in most other states.  They are referred to as “non-instrumentality charters.”
      3.    Those that are authorized by local school boards and that have their teachers employed by school districts. These schools don’t have much autonomy and are different from charters in most other states.
They are referred to as “instrumentality charters.” This arrangement has created a lot of confusion within the state about public charter schools. In an effort to clarify what a charter school is, our bill requires instrumentality charters to either become non-instrumentality charters or magnet schools, leaving the state with two categories of true charter schools. My passion for education reform stems from my experiences in the military, the business world, and as a father of four. As a military intelligence officer in the United States Army, I am convinced that our greatest national security risk, in the long term, is the complacency with the educational status quo. Charter schools offer innovation and focus on science, technology, engineering and math that can enhance the life experiences of our children. These innovative charter schools can propel our economy beyond the 21st century and ensure our nation’s defenders are not only America’s best and brightest, but also represent the world’s best and brightest. Representative Dale Kooyenga was elected to represent the 14th District for the Wisconsin State Assembly in 2010.

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Nearly 20 Percent of the Top 100 U.S. Public High-Schools are Charters

The Washington Post on Monday released a list of the highest-performing public high schools in the nation based upon a special index that measures how effective a school prepares its students for college. The “High School Challenge” index named the top 1900 public high schools in the nation—we’re proud to announce 18 public charter schools were among the top 100:  
Rank (High School Challenge, Washington Post) Public Charter School City, State
#3  Corbett Charter School Corbett, Oregon
#4  BASIS Tucson Tucson, Arizona
#8  Signature Evansville Evansville, Indiana
#10  North Hills Prep Irving, Texas
 #11  Peak Preparatory School  Dallas, Texas
#19 Westlake Academy  Westlake, Texas
#24 Preuss School UCSD  La Jolla, California
#27  Sonoran Science Academy – Tucson Tucson, Arizona
#36  University High Fresno, California
#37  Eastwood Academy Houston, Texas
#41  Sturgis Charter Hyannis, Massachusetts
#42  American Indian Public Charter Oakland, California
#50  Peak to Peak Charter Lafayette, Colorado
#54  Raleigh Charter Raleigh, North Carolina
#57  Benjamin Franklin New Orleans, Louisiana
#60  MATCH Charter Boston, Massachusetts
#62  Harding Charter Prep Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
#83  Summit Preparatory Charter High Redwood City, California
  Read how the Post used academic indicators such as AP-course enrollment and graduation rates to compile the list. Congratulations to all of the school leaders, teachers, administrators, families and students that are affiliated with these public charter high schools. Be sure to notify us of any press you garner so we can share news of your media spotlight in our social network spaces and advocacy e-blasts. Please send us pictures of any recognition ceremonies you may coordinate as well:NAPCSpressroom@publiccharters.org.

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What Parents Want—And How Charters Can Provide It

Last week, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute released a groundbreaking study, What Parents Want: Education Preferences and Trade-offs. In collaboration with market-research firm Harris Interactive, Fordham attempted to segment American parents into distinguishable groups based on their educational values and desires. Surprisingly, Fordham and Harris found that parents’ must-haves don’t vary greatly: everyone wants high-quality instruction in core subjects and STEM fields; they want their kids to learn to think critically and to communicate strongly; and they want schools to instill good study habits. But some parents also prefer specializations and emphases that are only possible in a system of school choice.
  • Pragmatists (36 percent of K-12 parents) value schools that offer vocational classes or job-related programs
  • Jeffersonians (24 percent) value instruction in citizenship, democracy, and leadership
  • Test-Score Hawks (23 percent) look for schools with high test scores
  • Multiculturalists (22 percent) want their kids to learn to work with others of diverse backgrounds
  • Expressionists (15 percent) want schools that emphasize art and music instruction
  • Strivers (12 percent) want a pathway to a top-tier college
Interestingly, if not surprisingly, Expressionists and Strivers are currently more likely to send their kids to charter schools than traditional public schools. (Arts-focused charters and “no excuses” charters are common throughout the country.) Some of these other niches, however, may not be well-served by charter schools, or by any schools. Could charter authorizers and entrepreneurs be doing more to create career and technical schools? Those focused on citizenship and leadership? Those with diverse student populations? It appears that there are “market opportunities” waiting to be tapped. Check out the study for much, much more. Take this quiz to find out what group you’re in. Michael J. Petrilli is the executive vice president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute.

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What is a public charter school?

During National Charter Schools Week, we celebrate achievements in the school house and the state house. These achievements could not have been possible without the commitment of teachers, leaders, parents and advocates from all parts of the country. We asked some of these individuals to tell us why they are a part of the charter schools movement. As executive director of the Public Charter Schools Alliance of South Carolina, Mary Carmichael gets asked all the time about charter schools.  Here’s her answer to the most basic, but most important question: What is a public charter school? It is a community where teachers are empowered to foster a lifelong love of discovering and applying new knowledge. It is a community where families have the opportunity to see their children flourish in a learning environment aligned to their needs. It is a community where school leaders are educational entrepreneurs allocating resources and developing a faculty of instructional innovators to advance the mission of the school. It is a community where boards are held accountable for being excellent stewards of public funds and improving students’ academic achievement. What is a public charter school? Public charter schools embody our American ideals of independent, innovative thinkers and doers.  They are public schools with the freedom to be more innovative while being held accountable for improving student achievement. National Charter School Week is an exciting time to be joining charter school leaders from across the country in Washington, D.C. to celebrate 20 years of innovation in public charter schools and to share knowledge on how to transform public education for all children in all of our communities. What is a public charter school? It is a community where we all can make a difference in the life of a child and impact in our collective future. NCSW SC Pic-2

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Interview with CRPE’s Betheny Gross on Blended Learning Model Innovations

Blended learning is an innovative education model that combines online and traditional instruction. The Center on Reinventing Public Education (CRPE) received a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study the financial implications of a range of blended learning models. I caught up with Dr. Betheny Gross, CRPE’s senior research analyst and research director, to talk about the study. Q: What is the framework of the study? A: There are two parts to the study.  One is to continue to develop a classification of blended [learning]. People take different approaches to blended learning. Many of the approaches are similar, but with their own take depending on different theories of action about teaching and learning. Some people go into blended thinking they need to radically personalize [education] for each student, and the best way we can do that is to harness technology. There are others that think about how best to optimize teachers by maximizing opportunities for kids to have in-depth discussions with teachers who are addressing their specific needs and goals. A way to do that is to have some of the instruction and curriculum happen over technology. Part of the work we’re doing is thinking through theories of action…what type of school do they imply in terms of teachers and technology, and then costing it out. In our observation of schools that are implementing these models, we’re asking and commenting on questions such as: What does the resource allocation look like? What resources are needed for start-up and for continuation [schools]? How are resources distributed throughout the building? Do traditional revenue structures correspond or not to the way these schools need to structure their resources? Q: What is the motivation of the study? A: A lot of people are looking to blended as something that’s a new and a vital piece of our progress in education. They’re seeing it as an opportunity to expand the capacity and productivity of teachers in schools. There’s a lot of energy behind it right now, and a lot of development going on in the field to make sure that there’s good research to support that development. Q: What do you hope to find out? A: What we want to understand is how resources are used, and the extent that we see a new distribution of labor and technology for the delivery of instruction. We also want to understand how schools pursuing this work can do it in a sustainable way. This is a challenging question because so many of the schools engaging in blended learning received substantial start-up grants. And we know that there are and can be rather substantial startup or transition costs, especially if it requires a big investment in network and fiber. Q: What role do public charter schools play in blended learning? A: Public charter schools are called on to be our innovators, to be our incubators. They have both the incentive and opportunity to really explore these models because of their ability to optimize resources in schools. I think there are a lot of incentives for charters. It’s not lost on anybody in the charter sector that they have to be very careful with budgets, which tend to be very tight. This is an opportunity to think through how technology can optimize their resources. With the freedom public charter schools have around resource allocation, they really do have the opportunity to go out and rethink the whole school from top to bottom. They don’t need to have 15 classrooms with a teacher and 30 kids in them. They don’t need to think about [getting] into spend-it-or-lose-it arrangements. They can think about how to structure their spending; how to reconfigure their revenue and expenditure flows; and different ways to structure pay for teachers. This is all within their reach–they don’t have many of the traditional revenue or expenditure constraints that district schools are now slowly unpacking. Charters can move very quickly. It’s not a surprise that a lot of the schools in our study are public charter schools. Q: What role do you see blended learning playing in the future of public education? A: I think it depends on what we find in these early studies, and there are also impact studies going on. I anticipate, although I don’t have any particular evidence to back this up, that we are going to see it more and more. I think that it’s an approach that addresses a lot of resource challenges that we are facing. I think it’s also an approach that’s very respecting of the fact that kids are brought up interacting with information differently than we did when we were kids. It tries to take advantage of that, and meet kids where they are with how they work with and think through information. And in that sense, it has a lot of great potential. Q: What is the timeline of the study? A: The study is a 19 month study starting from last December. An interim report will come out sometime in the fall, and then the final will be out the following summer. Behtany       Photo: Dr. Betheny Gross, Senior Research Analyst and Research Director at the Center on Reinventing Public Education (CRPE)

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Research Shows Presence of Public Charter Schools Leads to Improvements in Traditional Public Schools

When a public charter school opens in a neighborhood, there are several impacts that are worth consideration: Will the charter school create pressure on neighboring traditional public schools (TPS) to make changes in their organization, instructional strategies, or outreach to families that may lead to improvements in student achievement? New research presented at the Association for Education Finance and Policy (AEFP) 38th Annual Conference suggests that traditional public schools do in fact respond to the presence of public charter schools. Yusuke Jinnai, a Ph.D candidate in Economics at the University of Rochester, examined the impact of opening public charter schools on achievement levels for students at a neighboring traditional public school in North Carolina. A few interesting findings from the study:
  • Public charter schools generated “a positive and significant direct impact on student achievement” in math and reading at nearby traditional public schools.
  • About 25 percent of this direct impact can be explained by low-achieving students switching from traditional public schools to charter schools, leaving higher-performing students at traditional schools.
  • The larger portion of the impact was due to direct competitive effects. In other words, the presence of public charter schools encouraged TPS to make improvements for remaining students that lead to increases in student performance.
Using student-level North Carolina panel data from 1997 to 2005, the study is innovative because it focuses on gaps in grades between charter schools and TPS in North Carolina. Oftentimes, a charter school will open with a single grade level and expand their grade range in subsequent years. Jinnai uses this gap to tease out the direct impact charter schools have on TPS students in overlapping grades and indirect impact on non-overlapping grades. Previous research estimated the impact of charter schools on TPS for all grade levels, regardless of whether charter schools served students in all grade levels. Jinnai shows that the introduction of charter schools generates a positive and significant direct impact on student achievement: an increase of 0.033 standard deviations in math and 0.017 in reading for neighboring TPS students. While these gains are small in comparison to the impact of experienced teachers or per-pupil expenditure on achievement, they are larger and more accurate than previous competitive-effects studies due to the distinction between direct and indirect impact. Public charter schools in North Carolina attract lower performing students, but they are showing academic success. In 2010, 77 percent of public charter schools made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). In contrast, 57 percent of traditional public schools made AYP in 2010. With North Carolina lifting their 100-charter school cap in 2011 and receiving 70 new charter applications for the 2014-2015 school year, there is potential for significant learning gains for all public school students. Jinnai’s new paper debunks the myth that the success of public charter schools comes at the detriment of neighboring traditional public schools. In North Carolina, public charter schools contribute to education reform by serving low-performing students and encouraging high standards of performance for nearby traditional public schools. Boston Collegiate