Posts by Nora Kern

 

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What the Data Actually Say About Teacher Turnover

There is a persistent criticism that charter schools have dramatically high rates of teacher turnover due to burnout or dissatisfaction. However, national data paint a different picture.

Education Week’s Charters & Choice blog recently revisited the only national representative data on the rates at which teachers in charter and traditional public schools stay, move, or leave their teaching positions. The Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), administered by the U.S. Department of Education, acknowledged that the rate of teacher turnover has declined over the last three survey administrations.

According to the SASS Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS), between 2011-12 and 2012-13, about 84 percent of all teachers stayed in their job at the same school, eight percent continued to teach but moved to a different school, and eight percent left teaching. The overall teacher turnover rate has remained steady at around 15 percent for nearly 25 years.

However, the turnover rate for charter school teachers has declined over the past three rounds of the TFS, from about 24 percent to 18 percent. The most recent data (2012-13) show no statistically significant difference in the turnover rates between traditional public schools and charter schools for either movers or leavers.

map_teacher turnover

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS), “Current and Former Teacher Data Files,” 2012–13.

Additional EdWeek coverage does a good job a good job of noting complications with the data (see here and here), especially the difficulty in capturing variations at the school- and district-level. However, the national-level data do not indicate that on the whole charter schools have a problem with teacher retention.

Nora Kern is the Senior Manager for Research and Analysis and Susan Aud Pendergrass is the Senior Director for Research and Evaluation at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.

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The Debate on Charter School Applications

The American Enterprise Institute (AEI) recently release a report, The Paperwork Pileup, that analyzed the various questions and documentation required of public charter schools seeking authorization by state education agencies, higher education institutions, and independent charter boards. The report authors categorized the application questions into four quadrants according to the (in)appropriateness and (un)manageability of the requirement in terms of how the questions could impact school effectiveness. In short, AEI concludes that, “By larding up charter applications and branding those who do not want to or cannot jump through those hoops as not serious or qualified enough to run schools, we risk unjustly narrowing the pool of charter operators and shutting out innovation.”

Common sense says that paperwork for paperwork’s sake is unnecessary, but due diligence to ensure quality is necessary. Yet, the debate opens from there. The National Association of Charter School Authorizers (NACSA) and Thomas B. Fordham Institute both issued rebuttals to assertions made in the AEI report. So where do you fall on the authorizing debate? Are regulations overtaking autonomy, or are they necessary gatekeepers to ensure quality school openings? Thanks to AEI for elevating this important conversation, and to NACSA and Fordham for weighing in. Please leave a comment to tell us your thoughts on charter school application requirements.

Nora Kern is senior manager of research at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.

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CSP Funding Profile: Namaste Charter School

A Mission to Serve

Namaste Charter School was founded on the belief that healthy children are better learners. Its vision—to change the trajectory of underserved children’s lives—is enacted through holistic education for the children of Chicago’s South Side. Namaste’s daily health and wellness programs include 60 minutes of physical education and 20 minutes of recess, a ten-minute “Morning Movement” stretching and exercise routine set to music, and healthy breakfasts and lunches. Additionally, a peaceful school culture, collaborative practice, and respect of other languages and cultures are among the school’s core values. The public charter school operates on an extended school day and year, offers half of its classes as bilingual education (English and Spanish), and provides support for families through its Parent Center, so that teachers, staff, parents, and neighborhood leaders can work together to provide an exceptional academic environment.

From Vision to Reality: How CSP Funds Enabled Namaste to Open

The state of Illinois received a federal Charter Schools Program (CSP) State Education Agency (SEA) Grant in 2003. In December 2003, Illinois allocated funds from its CSP SEA Grant to award a pre-planning grant to Namaste Charter School prior to its authorization. Namaste used these funds to plan for the curriculum and structure of the school, as well as research the implementation of best practices.

Namaste opened in 2004 with just a kindergarten and first grade class, and has grown by one grade level each year to now serve K-8. For the first eight years of the school’s operation, Namaste had fixed asset costs for desks, furniture, books, computers, teacher professional development, and “everything under the sun” as founder Allison Slade described it. In addition, the school’s original building needed about $100,000 of renovations to the infrastructure—including building a kitchen, which was essential to provide the healthy meals that are a central part of the school model.

In 2006 Namaste received a second CSP grant, which was crucial to helping the charter school grow. The CSP funds were used to cover start-up costs, as well as seed money for the school library. The library resource center has been crucial for providing high-quality literacy instruction and increasing access to text for students and their families during the school day and on weekends. After three years of operation, Namaste outgrew its original building and needed to renovate a larger school space.

For its future, Namaste has invested in circulating its best practices nationwide instead of replicating the school. It received a $192,000 two-year CSP Dissemination Grant in 2012 from the U.S. Department of Education that helped launch the Learning the Namaste Way Institute, which has trained more than 80 school leaders during two- to three- day seminars that share holistic education best practices and provide ongoing support for implementing them in their own schools. For the future of all public charter schools, Ms. Slade believes that Congress can best support high-quality growth through access to facilities funding and protecting the autonomy that allows a charter school to nimbly allocate its resources to serve student needs.

Principal’s Office

During her career as a teacher, as a Teach for America corps member in Houston and then in the Chicago inner-city and suburbs, Ms. Slade never felt that she really found a place that matched her beliefs about education and had all of the elements in place to propel teachers, students, and families to their highest possible achievement. She was on a volleyball team with fellow educators, and they would discuss what the perfect school would look like. At the same time, Illinois raised the cap on the number of public charter schools allowed in Chicago. So Ms. Slade decided to pull together everything she had talked about with fellow educators, health professionals, and other experts, into a proposal for an innovative public charter school.

As Ms. Slade describes the resulting Namaste Charter School, “We pride ourselves on having this rigorous academic curricula that is tied together with health and wellness and a peaceful school culture. We not only implement that in our school, but now with the CSP funding, we also disseminate those best practices to other schools across the country.”

Heard in the Halls: Teacher and Student Perspectives

  • “What I enjoy teaching most at Namaste is that beyond our health and wellness initiative, I truly think that students, staff, parents are all pushed to be our best selves.”—Veronica Acuna, Special Education Manager 

  • “Seeing students just happy to come to school is a very rewarding thing. Parents come to us and say ‘we’re so lucky we found you. We are so happy that we got a lottery spot for Namaste.’”—Veronica Acuna

  • “I am proud to work at Namaste because I have the freedom to choose a curriculum that fits my students’ lives.”— Milli Salguero, middle school Social Studies

  • “Teachers feel really empowered here to implement what they think is most necessary for their students to achieve at high levels. Now, after three years of graduating classes, we have the great fortune to have our alumni return back and talk to us about how Namaste has impacted their lives.”—Allison Slade, Founder

  • “Really changing the trajectory of underserved children’s lives, which is Namaste’s vision, is a long-term prospect. That is not something you’re going to see after a year or two years. But after 11 years [of operation], we are far into really feeling some very powerful examples of that.” —Allison Slade, Founder

  • “I truly believe that charter schools are houses of innovation that can try things differently and teach public schools, and other schools, ways to do things more efficiently to get better results quicker. And really and truly here at Namaste, that’s what we’re trying to do.” —Allison Slade, Founder
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CSP Funding Profile: Crossroads Academy of Kansas City

A Mission to Serve

Crossroads Academy of Kansas City (CAKC) strives to be the premier urban school serving Kansas City’s youth and a destination for other educators seeking inspiration and best practices. Based on three pillars—high expectations, 21st Century learning, and community engagement—Crossroads Academy aims to graduate students who pursue their dreams relentlessly and have a positive impact on their family, their community, and the world. Crossroads Academy students utilize their downtown location by walking to cultural amenities like Barney Allis Plaza for recess, the Kansas City Central Library—which serves as the school library—and The Folly Theater for field trips and student performances.

Hiring and developing outstanding teachers is a top priority for Crossroads Academy’s leadership team. CAKC’s instructors have 10 years of teaching experience on average, including experience teaching in urban settings. The school operates on an extended school day and academic year, amounting to 37 percent more instructional time than the Missouri state standard.

From Vision to Reality: How CSP Funds Enabled CAKC to Open

In 2011, Crossroads Academy had an initial fundraising goal of $920,000. The school received a startup grant through the federal Charter Schools Program (CSP) starting in May 2012 for $125,000 per year for three years to launch the school. Crossroads Academy operated on a shoe-string budget during the initial five months of its start-up period. A successful first round of fundraising and receipt of the CSP grant enabled the school to begin paying salaries to its founding team and to purchase critical materials like computers, library resources, and curricula.

To meet their overall fundraising goal, additional funds for the school’s building renovation were raised from the local philanthropic community. By having CSP funding to cover initial staffing and curricular costs, the school was able to dedicate $818,000 in funds raised through private donors toward building renovation, which was the most costly part of the startup process. Executive Director Dean Johnson noted that receiving the CSP startup grant was not only a substantial amount of funds, but it also showed that a federal entity essentially endorsed the school’s funding application and vision, which in turned opened more doors in the local philanthropic community. It would have been impossible for the school to meet its fundraising goals and begin serving students in 2012 without the CSP startup funds. Johnson strongly encourages Congress to continue funding the CSP program so that more schools can access these startup funds, which are critical in states like Missouri where state funding does not kick in until there are students in the classroom.

Principal’s Office

Crossroads Academy Co-Founders and Executive Team Leaders Dean Johnson and Tysie McDowell-Ray met while working together on the leadership team of another Kansas City public charter elementary school. During their time working at the elementary school, they achieved significant academic and financial improvements for the school, and also discovered that they had a common vision for a new public charter school. They teamed up in August 2011 to combine their 20 years of educational experience to launch Crossroads Academy. “It was exciting for me professionally to be able to help bring to life something that we hope and we think is having a positive impact in our community by affording parents a choice that they’re really excited about,” Johnson reflected on the experience of launching Crossroads Academy.

Principal Tysie McDowell-Ray noted that, “One of the things that makes our school special is our staff. Through the hiring process, we bring in staff who are highly trained and who can create hands-on and engaging lessons for the students.” She explains that CAKC serves its students by “trying to be a broader school to meet the needs of all the students here.”

Heard in the Halls: Teacher and Student Perspectives

  • “If we’re going to build a better society, a better community in the 21st century, we need great schools that are empowering our kids to master those basic learning standards, but also empowering them and enabling them to become great thinkers, great problem solvers, and great innovators.”—Dean Johnson, Executive Director
  • “A challenge here in Kansas City is that we don’t have a lot of high-quality school options. I have three kids of my own, so I know that struggle. We started this school for those parents who choose to stay in the city.”—Tysie McDowell-Ray, Principal
  • “I’m getting better grades here than at my last school. There are more ways for you to express yourself, and you get many opportunities here.”—Itzel Mendez, 6th grade
  • ““I think we have an obligation within charter schools to set the expectation for public schools all around. It shouldn’t be just high expectations for charter schools. What we have is the ability to be different from the beginning. So we should be the leaders to encourage change, and facilitate change, and demand change across the board for what is happening in classrooms everywhere.”—Kara Schumacher, Kindergarten teacher
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New CREDO Study Shows Urban Charter Schools Outperform District Peers

A report released yesterday by The Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) at Stanford University, Urban Charter School Study Report on 41 Regions, found that public charter schools located in our nation’s largest urban districts are showing significant positive performance impacts for the most disadvantaged students. Overall, students enrolled in urban public charter schools gained 40 additional days of learning in math and 28 additional days in reading compared to their traditional public school peers. Moreover, the longer a student attended an urban public charter school, the greater the gains: Four or more years of enrollment in an urban charter school led to 108 additional learning days in math and 72 more days of learning gains in reading. Given that more than half of all charter schools are in urban areas, this is a significant finding.

The study examined traditional and charter public school data in 41 of the largest urban regions in 22 states from the 2006-07 through 2011-12 school years. The same methodology that was popularized in CREDO’s 2013 National Charter School Studymatching students on a variety of factors, including demographics, special needs, poverty level, and prior test scores—was used to create a virtual traditional public school “twin” for each charter school student.

The findings from the 41 regions show that urban charter schools are positively impacting both ends of the performance spectrum when compared to traditional public schools—with more charter schools outpacing (26 regions in math, 23 in reading), and fewer charter schools lagging below (11 in math and 10 in reading). In fact, charter schools outperform traditional schools by a two-to-one margin across these urban districts.

Further, urban public charter schools are serving disadvantaged students particularly well:

  • Hispanic English language learners showed the greatest learning gains of any student subgroup, with 72 additional days of learning in math and 79 in reading.
  • Students living in poverty gained 24 learning days in math and 17 in reading by attending an urban public charter school.
    • Black students in poverty showed gains equivalent to 59 instructional days in math and 44 days in reading.
  • Students with special needs showed learning gains equivalent to nine additional instructional days in math and 13 in reading.

There are districts with especially large gains. Charter school mathematics learning gains in the Bay Area (California), Boston, District of Columbia, Memphis, New Orleans, New York City, and Newark were much stronger than traditional school results. Comparison reading gains were notable for the Bay Area, Boston, Memphis, Nashville, and Newark charter schools. New York City and South Bay, stand out for providing positive gains for their students in both math and reading and serving a student body with achievement equal to or higher than the average achievement within their state.

Public charter schools that are demonstrating marked academic gains for their students deserve every opportunity to flourish. The federal Charter Schools Program Charter Schools Program (CSP) supports the creation of new schools and the replication of charter schools that are producing results. Click here to encourage your Members of Congress to give additional funding to the CSP so that more students can benefit for a great public school education.

Nora Kern is senior manager of research at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.

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CSP Funding Profile: Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women

A Mission to Serve

The Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women (BLSYW) was founded on a simple goal: to give public school students the same quality education and opportunities as their peers in private schools. The school’s all-girls environment prepares the young women of Baltimore city for success in college and life through a strong school culture and innovative teaching practice.

BLSYW cultivates strong habits of mind and a sense of community by educating the whole young woman—emotionally, physically and academically. Its college preparatory model emphasizes science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM); fields in which women are underrepresented. Other specialized programming at BLSYW includes small class sizes, leadership opportunities, Peer Group Connection mentoring to ease the transition from middle to high school, a week-long Bridge program in the summer to get new students acclimated to the culture at BLSYW, and annual college visits for every student.

From Vision to Reality: How CSP Funds Enabled BLSYW to Open

BLSYW was approved to open in 2008. Its plan was to start with a single 6th grade class comprised of 120 students, and there were over 200 applications for the inaugural class. The school received $550,000 in startup funds through the federal Charter Schools Program (CSP), which was used to supplement the funding for the first year of the school. The funds were used to pay teachers during the planning year of the school, to develop curriculum, purchase textbooks and technology, and recruit new students.

Even starting the school with just one grade, the startup funds were not enough to sustain a school. That said, Executive Director Maureen Colburn noted that without the CSP startup funds, the school would not have been able to open. The startup funds were used for basics as well as bringing the initial staff—six teachers and two administrators—together around BLSYW’s mission and develop the school culture. The school received a second $200,000 CSP grant in 2011 to help align mathematics and English language arts curriculum with Common Core State Standards.

Principal’s Office

All of the senior leadership at BLSYW—Maureen Colburn (Executive Director), Brenda Hamm (Principal), and Heather Skopak (Assistant Principal)—attended all-girls schools. So for them, the school mission is personal. Ms. Colburn helped found three all-girls public schools in New York City during her seven-year term as the Executive Director of the Young Women’s Leadership Network. On the all-girls learning environment, she notes that, “I believe so much that this is a choice that should be available to parents and families in the public school system,” and should not just be accessible to those who can afford private single-gender schools. “It’s been my career to make that possible for underserved, under-resourced kids.”

Principal Brenda Hamm came to BLSYW as a career educator and administer in all-girls private schools. She said that the ability to provide this quality of educational experience in the public school setting is, “…an opportunity that should be available to all kids. Why is it that we can’t somehow create that environment for every single for every single young man and young woman at least from the perspective of having great teachers, great courses, high expectations, great support system, bringing people together and saying ‘you can do this!’ and we will provide you with a wonderful environment.”

Heather Skopak, Assistant Principal, speaks to her connection to the school model: “I went to an all-girls school myself, and the environment and the academics provided me and with really everything that I have today. And I attribute it to that. So being able to provide our girls in Baltimore with the option of a single-gender school was really important for me.” Ms. Skopak further notes that the single gender model, “helps teachers target instruction to the ways girls learn best. Our teachers become very qualified in being able to identify the different strategies and techniques that they can use in the classroom just for girls. We’re also able to look at incentives for girls and what makes them work hard to get to college.”

Heard in the Halls: Teacher and Student Perspectives

  • “Here at BLSYW, they promote leadership and sisterhood. And in the classroom, teachers show us how to become leaders globally, and our sisters are there to influence each other and remind each other that we’re going to transform Baltimore one young woman at a time.”—Cyrena Lawrence, 10th grade
  • “I learn something every day from the students. I also teach something every day which is a reward itself to know that I have affected some students’ lives in some way.” —Atom Zerfas, Algebra I and Geometry Teacher
  • “2016 will be our first graduating class. It’s exciting and scary all at the same time…Being a new school, there’s a lot that has to happen with this senior class. They will actually put us on the map. So it’s exciting when talking to colleges; and colleges are excited because it’s a whole new crop of students.”—Paula Dofat, Director of College Counseling
  • “I like schools where people know me by my name. And I found that ever since [my daughter Cyrena] started, people know me as Mrs. Lawrence.”—Donnet Lawrence, parent
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Students with disabilities transfer out of charter schools less frequently than district schools

The New York City Independent Budget Office (IBO) released a study last month, which looked at elementary students’ transfer rates out of charter and traditional public schools. This report is an update of the IBO’s report on the same topic, released last year. As we noted in an earlier blog post, this issue is very relevant because researchers have found that changing schools can affect student achievement, and it may be a contributor to the achievement gap for minority and disadvantaged students who change schools frequently.

For the most recent study, IBO monitored a cohort of students starting kindergarten in 2008—with about 3,000 enrolled in public charter schools and 7,200 traditional public school students—and followed these students through their fourth grade year. The study found that on average, students attending public charter schools stay enrolled in the same school at a higher rate (64 percent) than students at nearby traditional public schools (56 percent). Students in charter schools left the city’s public school system at the same rate as students in nearby traditional public schools.

Both the 2014 and 2015 reports included separate mobility analyses for students with disabilities. However, for the 2015 study, the IBO broadened its definition of special needs students to include any student identified as having a disability, while the 2014 report only included students in full-time special education programs. Of the students identified as eligible for special needs services in kindergarten, 53 percent who attended charter schools remained in the same school four years later, while 49 percent of traditional public school students with disabilities remained in the same school through fourth grade.

Fewer special needs students in the initial kindergarten cohort attended public charter schools (8.9 percent) than traditional public schools (12.7 percent). However, the distribution of students by disability type was similar among both types of public schools. The most common disability, speech impairment, was identified in 70.0 percent of charter students and 68.5 percent of traditional public school kindergarteners. Among the kindergarten students identified with speech, learning, and “all other disabilities,”(this category includes: autistic, emotionally disturbed, hard of hearing, intellectual disability, multiply handicapped, orthopedically impaired, preschool disability, and visually impaired), those who started kindergarten in charter schools remained at their schools at a higher rate.

Nora Kern is senior manager for research and analysis at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.

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CSP Funding Profile: Thurgood Marshall Academy

A Mission to Serve

Thurgood Marshall Academy (TMA) Public Charter was founded by law students and attorneys at Georgetown University Law Center’s DC Street Law clinic who wanted to offer underserved students more academic and social development opportunities. The school’s mission is to prepare students to succeed in college and to actively engage in our democratic society. Its challenging academic curriculum is infused with the theme of law and justice. The foundational legal skills—argumentation, negotiation, critical thinking, research, and advocacy—will prepare students for success in any career.

TMA offers specialized programming, including: a Summer Prep program to help transition 9th and 10th graders from other schools to its rigorous academic environment; an annual portfolio assessment process that requires students to examine their academic achievements and struggles and present their plans for the future to a panel of teachers, staff members, volunteers, and parents; and a year-long Senior Seminar with intensive coaching on the college application process.

From Vision to Reality: How CSP Funds Enabled Thurgood Marshall Academy to Open

It is important to remember that for public charter schools, funding from the local government does not kick in until students are enrolled in the school. As Dr. Alexandra Pardo, the school’s Executive Director, notes, “When we got our charter, what we had was a piece of paper. What we didn’t have was a building, furniture, textbooks, any resources for our students. And that’s when CSP funds became critical for TMA.”

Thurgood Marshall Academy received a $540,000 startup grant in 2001 through the federal Charter Schools Program (CSP). These funds were used for mission critical, yet basic, operations—like purchasing a curriculum and textbooks, hiring staff, partially funding facilities, and equipping the school with desks and whiteboards. Without CSP funds, the founders would not have been able to build a school from the ground up.

Thurgood Marshall Academy opened in the 2001-02 school year in the annex to the Congress Heights United Methodist Church. The school immediately knew that to operate a full high school program, it would need new facilities.

In 2005, TMA acquired and renovated the long-vacant Nichols Avenue School, a historic building in southeast D.C. The new facility opened in 2005, and over the years, TMA has raised an additional $13.5 million in grants and loans from the D.C. government, businesses, and foundations for full renovation.

Principal’s Office

Dr. Pardo was drawn to TMA due to its mission and its ability as a public charter school to have the flexibility to make choices for its students that have immediate impact. She notes that the most rewarding part of her job is, “Seeing our students every day in the hallway, seeing their struggles, seeing their success when they hold a Thurgood Marshall diploma. And most importantly when they hold a college degree four years after leaving us.”

Dr. Pardo believes that Congress plays an integral role in supporting public charter schools. First, this is done through its protection of charter school autonomy at a national level. The second piece is looking at equal funding for charter schools. On national average, charter schools receive 20 percent less funding than district schools. As more and more students enroll in charter schools throughout the country, Congress can ensure equity between charter and district school funding because they are all public school students.

Heard in the Halls: Teacher and Student Perspectives

“Our students come from challenging histories, but they are resilient and forward-thinking. It gives me hope for the future and these kids become our leaders in the states and globally. It makes me feel like the world is in good hands.” — Karen Lee, Social Studies Department Chair

“Thurgood Marshall Academy has proven that schools serving the students most at risk can be successful when we lift up all the excuses and barriers.” — Dr. Alexandra Pardo, Executive Director

“Receiving an education helps you answer all your questions. When it’s a great education…you can explore for yourself.” — Sydni Foshee, 12th grade

“We offer our students the opportunity to recognize that anything is possible with hard work. You don’t have to settle for the choices that might be given to you despite your circumstances.” — Sanjay Mitchell, Director of College and Alumni Programs

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Parents’ Perspective on School Choice

This month, the Center for Reinventing Public Education (CRPE) released a report, How Parents Experience Public School Choice, which contains survey findings from 4,000 parents of K-12 students living in eight “high-choice” U.S. cities, defined as those with many non-neighborhood-based schools and with a range of oversight structures. The 500 parents from each location—Baltimore, Cleveland, Denver, Detroit, Indianapolis, New Orleans, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C.—answered questions about their ability to access other school options, their impression of the trajectory of their school district, their priorities for selecting a school, and their ability to find a school that fits their student’s needs.

Some key findings include:

  • In districts that offer parents an alternative to their assigned school, parents are utilizing their ability to choose. On the high end, 87 percent of New Orleans parents choose an alternative to their neighborhood school, while 35 percent of Indianapolis parents choose public charter schools.
  • School choice experiences vary for parents in different cities. Sixty percent of Denver parents said they had another good public school option in addition to their child’s current school. Just 40 percent of Philadelphia parents reported another quality option.
  • Navigating school choice options is more challenging for parents with less education, minority parents, and those whose children have special needs.
  • There have been uneven investments in school choice supports—namely, centralized information, enrollment, and transportation systems—among the high-choice cities.

In these eight cities, CPRE found that at least half of the city’s parents were choosing a school other than their assigned district school. This corresponds with the data in our latest A Growing Movement: America’s Largest Charter School Communities report, in which Cleveland, Detroit, Indianapolis, New Orleans, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C. rank among the top ten school districts in the nation for the highest charter school enrollment share, and Baltimore and Denver are both in the top 25.

It’s no surprise that parents in Denver, New Orleans, and Washington, D.C. reported more positive results. These cities have been actively investing in developing high-quality school options, closing low performers, developing transportation systems, creating accessible information on school features and performance, and implementing a common enrollment system. CRPE notes “more than half of the parents in these cities reported that their cities’ schools are getting better, compared to less than a third of parents in Baltimore, Cleveland, and Philadelphia.” Further, 80 percent of D.C. parents and 79 percent of those in New Orleans reported that academics are the most important factor in choosing a school—over safety and location. This is a testament that families in these cities have access to safe schools.

The report concludes that “all cities have work to do to ensure choice works for all families.” To improve access to high-quality schools, CRPE recommends expanding the supply of high-quality schools, providing for specialized student needs, providing free and safe transportation to schools, and investing in information systems to help parents make informed choices.

Nora Kern is senior manager of research at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.

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21 Public Charter Schools Recognized as 2014 National Blue Ribbon Schools

The National Blue Ribbon Schools Program, as described by the U.S. Department of Education, “recognizes public and private elementary, middle, and high schools based on their overall academic excellence or their progress in closing achievement gaps among student subgroups.” This year, the 21 charter schools were among the 287 public schools throughout the nation named 2014 National Blue Ribbon Schools by the U.S. Secretary of Education.

In order to be eligible for the National Blue Ribbon award, the school must have made Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs) or Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for three consecutive years, including the year the school is nominated. Additionally, one-third of all the nominated schools in a state must serve at least 40 percent of students from disadvantaged backgrounds. This year there are nine more public charter schools that earned the National Blue Ribbon School—up from twelve charter school award winners in 2013. Congratulations to the 2014 National Blue Ribbon public charter schools for their outstanding educational programs and accomplishments!

Charter School State
Mesquite Elementary School Arizona
Reid Traditional Schools’ Valley Academy Arizona
Bullis Purissima Charter School California
KIPP Summit Academy California
Academy of Dover Charter School Delaware
Crossroad Academy Florida
Doral Performing Arts & Entertainment Academy Florida
Mater Gardens Academy Florida
Terrace Community Middle School Florida
Elite Scholars Academy Charter School Georgia
Lake Oconee Academy Georgia
Signature School Indiana
Pace Charter School of Hamilton New Jersey
Genesee Community Charter School New York
South Bronx Classical Charter School New York
Raleigh Charter High School North Carolina
Columbus Preparatory Academy Ohio
Franklin Towne Charter High School Pennsylvania
Houston Academy for International Studies Texas
KIPP Houston High School Texas
KIPP Sharp College Prep Texas

Nora Kern is senior manager of research at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.