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Student Voices: AB Bustamante

Today’s featured student blogger, AB Bustamante, is a charter school student at the Uplift Peak Preparatory High School. The school’s student body is made up of approximately 90% minority students, and nearly 93% are low-income.  In his post, AB talks about Uplift’s Road to College program and his plans after graduating high school. You can learn more about Uplift Peak Preparatory Academy on the Public Charter Schools Data Dashboard.

What has been the best part about being in the Road to College program?

“The best part about being in the Road to College program is having a dedicated and motivated college counseling team ready to assist me through the entire college process. There is nothing more satisfying and calming than knowing that I have four college counselors willing to set everything aside to help me file my taxes, fill out college applications, revise my essays, etc. Without their unrelenting help, my senior year would have been much more stressful, and I wouldn’t have sought the many scholarship opportunities they found for me.”

What are you most excited about for college?

“It was an exciting moment when I opened my letter of acceptance and offer of appointment to the United States Naval Academy. I knew that the next four years would be the most challenging and demanding four years of my life. I’m excited to attend Plebe Summer after my graduation and undergo the transformation from a civilian to a midshipman. I am eager to discover the vast opportunities the Naval Academy will offer me to engage in politics in Washington D.C. as I pursue a major in Political Science. However, the most exciting thing will be graduating with my Class of 2018 and being commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps.”

What drives you to succeed?

“There is a motto among the elite fighting warriors, the U.S. Navy SEALs, which states, “The Only Easy Day Was Yesterday.” I have experienced the meaning of this motto firsthand. Being the eldest of three children and the only male figure in a household under the poverty line has been a challenging reality I have had to face since the age of 13. Seeing my mother struggle alone with the burdens of poverty enraged me but also motivated me to get a job to help my mom pay monthly expenses. Having a job and going to school at the same time has been tough, and although I doubted my efforts at times, I never quit. It was a drive within me that pushed me to face the next day’s problems with determination and confidence. I don’t plan to quit any time soon either; I plan to work in public policy/public administration to pressure our legislative body to enact policies to target and solve the rising problem of poverty in America. Although I can’t eradicate poverty completely, I won’t be satisfied until I reach something close to complete eradication.”

What are you most proud of that you have accomplished in your high school career?

“Being the first in my family to graduate from high school is the accomplishment I’m most proud of. My parents never reached high school, as they dropped out of sixth grade in Mexico in order to come to the United States. Graduating will not only make my parents proud, but I will also send a message to my younger sisters (both of whom attend Uplift Peak) that with a goal in mind and strong determination, nothing is impossible.”

 

Post originally published on Uplift Voices blog